Articles Tagged ‘Labour’

  • Social democracy without social democrats: how can the left recover?


    If Keir or Keira Hardie were to create a party today to make the 21stcentury both social and democratic it would look nothing like the Labour Party. Can Labour and other social democratic parties change? Or will they be replaced? On one hand the omens aren’t good. The tribalism and the arrogance of Labour runs deep. But then organisations can reinvent themselves. But this time it’s more than a switch back to Blairites or the continuation of Corbynism that is required.

  • Marx at the Movies

    It is the story of how the youthful Marx and Engels became fast friends and worked together as a team to overcame the obstacles they faced in order to build the first communist organization in history based on a scientific analysis of the capitalist system. For millennia, the lower classes had always dreamed of overthrowing their oppressors and creating a new world based on freedom and equality but it was only in the 1840s that a theoretical basis for such a transformation was developed.

  • Fragmentation in Toronto’s Hotel Sector


    Indeed, for hotel workers – largely immigrants, women, and people of colour – raiding is an expensive distraction that divides workers and gives employers an advantage. What several of these commentaries fail to acknowledge is that in the current structure of organized labour, fragmentation is actually the norm and unity is the exception. Fragmented union representation in the hotel sector is a prime example of this reality and has been this way for some time.

  • Workers strike back: Ontario’s minimum wage


    The business backlash to the minimum wage increase has sparked a desire to broadly organize those in low-wage, precarious work, and to reform legislation so as to make that process more feasible. And while the developing news around UNIFOR’s disaffiliation from the Canadian Labour Congress could stymie the collaborate efforts of local activists to push back against the bosses, there is hope that a new era of organization might be just beginning.

  • Amazon Is a 21st-Century Digital Chain Gang


    When Amazon announced plans to locate a $5 billion complex as its second headquarters somewhere in North America, state governments fell over themselves offering billions in tax abatements and corporate subsidies to secure the prize. It might behoove the remaining 20 cities that have made the final cut to heed the warning from Virgil’s Aeneid: “I fear the Greeks, even when they are bearing gifts.” Especially when the gifts come in the form of a modern-day digital chain gang.

  • Rachel Notley’s war cry against B.C. is an ill-fated strategy

    Canadian Politics

    So what is the alternative? Alberta’s problem is all of Canada’s problem. Canada needs to reduce its GHG emissions rapidly and deeply, if we are to do our fair share to stave off the worst scenarios of global warming. We must do this, because it is simply unethical to shift this burden onto future generations and onto people elsewhere in the world who have fewer means to make this transition and who will suffer far more from the consequences of failure. We are all in this together.

  • Pension funds fuel privatization in Canada and Québec

    Canadian Politics

    A peculiar but important aspect of this destructive policy is the central involvement of workers’ pensionfunds in the process. It is not widely reported that the large Canadian and Québec public pension funds have become key institutional forces supporting and reaping profits from the privatization and financialization of public infrastructure, both here and, to even greater degree, internationally.

  • Crisis in the Canadian Labour Movement


    On January 17th, 2018 the Canadian labour movement was plunged into a crisis with the exit of Unifor from the Canadian Labour Congress and the launching of raids on bargaining units of UNITEHERE Local 75. This open letter is intended as an urgent call for leaders in our movement, at every level, to strive to find a solution to this potential rupture before it becomes irreparable.

  • Nearly Half of Canadians are Left with $200 or Less After Paying their Monthly Bills and Debt

    Economic Crisis

    Nearly half of Canadians are $200 or less away from financial insolvency each month after paying their bills and debt obligations. This is down 12 points from September 2016, when 56% of Canadians were facing the same challenge. The current 44% who are $200 or less away from financial insolvency includes those who are left with $1-$200 (17%), and the more than one in four (27%) who are left with nothing and already consider themselves insolvent at the end of the month.

  • Venezuelan people are prime victims of Ottawa’s sanctions

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    The Maduro government is by no means exempt from responsibility for these deteriorating conditions. It has displayed a remarkable ineptness in its failure to overcome the economic crisis by tackling its underlying causes, notwithstanding some innovative maneuvering that has, for now, staved off the offensive by its right-wing political opponents and their foreign supporters.

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