Articles Tagged ‘Labour’

  • Toxic Tsunami

    Canadian Business

    With governments acting as complicit handmaidens of private mining companies, it is only social movements and public institutional voices from churches and universities that stand for an end to corporate impunity. We need to up our game in defending not only the workers and communities affected by mining, but also the very land and watersheds and ecological systems that extractivism destroys.

  • The Power of Deep Organizing

    Social Movements

    Raising Expectations was full of struggles that McAlevey was directly involved in – struggles that showed what could be done despite the overwhelming power of capital. It had a personal, chatty feel to it and had an instant and powerful impact on rank-and-file workers and labour activists, quickly and deservedly making McAlevey a hit on the labour circuit as a speaker, trainer, and strategist.

  • Transnationalism and Italian anarchists in Canada, 1915-1940

    Travis Tomchuck’s Transnational Radicals focuses on the movement of Italian anarchists from Italy to Canada and the U.S. and back to Italy to show the long-term contours of the Italian anarchist movement and its activities across borders, thus the term “transnational.” Transnationalism is the process by which migrants create and sustain social relations that link their societies of origin and societies of settlement.

  • Basic Income: Progressive Dreams Meet Neoliberal Realities

    Economic Crisis

    The model of BI that governments are working on in their social policy laboratories will not ‘end the tyranny of the labour market’ but render it more dreadful. The agenda of austerity and privatization requires a system of income support that renders people as powerless and desperate as possible in the face of exploitation and that won’t change if it is relabelled as ‘Basic Income’.

  • Mapping the vocabulary of the radical Left

    This wide spectrum of essays offers richly grounded and concrete tools for navigating anticapitalist struggle. For example, John Bellamy Foster’s and Patrick Bond’s respective chapters on nature and sustainability provide conceptual and historical clarity for any political project that considers environmental destruction and the limits of natural resources, time, labour and money.

  • Portland to vote on taxing companies if CEO earns 100 times more than staff

    Economic Crisis

    The disparity between workers’ and CEOs’ pay has been rising sharply since the 1960s, when the average ratio was around 20-1. It now stands at above 200-1. Novick’s proposal would increase current corporate income taxes by 10% if a company CEO had a salary ratio of above 100-1, and by 25% for CEOs with a ratio of 250-1 or higher.

  • Organising to Win: Direct Action Wins at Frite Alors!

    Labour

    A lot of the labour movement knows that there are serious problems with the way unions have developed in Canada. If you say “we rely too much on the grievance procedure,” people will nod sagely. If you say “we need to find a way to get back to our roots and use organization on the job to pressure management into making concessions,” a lot of people are going to agree with you.

  • Canada Post workers fight for a fairer, greener future

    Environment

    Canada Post could become the hub of a greener economy in our communities. The infrastructure exists and, combined with postal banking, Canada Post can once again become a powerhouse for community connections. The vision of Delivering Community Power is limited only by a lack of political will and the stubborn opposition of the Harper holdouts currently running the show at Canada Post.

  • Protesting the Capitalist University

    Europe

    Yet as I walk the line in the bitter cold talking with chemists, social workers, sociologists, accounting professors it occurs to me that we are in the end the university and that management is in the end the product of an ongoing usurpation of both labour and knowledge. Next week I will lecture on this in an improvised teach-in on the picket line. Learning must go on.

  • The U of M stands at a historic crossroads

    Education

    Turning education into a high-priced commodity is constricting access once again just when greater numbers of women, minorities, and Indigenous people have begun to access it. These are among the reasons why UMFA supports low or no fees, greater public funding of post-secondary higher education, and a return to universities’ core educational, researching, and training functions.

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