Articles Tagged ‘Labour’

  • Big Three Bargaining: Different Ways of Making History


    The time seemed ripe to lead a reversal in the labour movement’s trajectory – but this was not even tried. That failure defines what was in fact ‘historic’ about the 2016 agreement: it was not the highly overblown claims of the union’s achievements, but the confirmation of the end of the union’s leadership legacy within the labour and social movements.

  • Getting Ready for the Tory Storm in Manitoba

    Canadian Politics

    People who recognize what the Tories have in mind for Manitoba should set ourselves the goal of building active opposition to their attacks. Just waiting for the next election will mean not even trying to repel Tory attacks. Just waiting will also demoralize people hurt by the Tories, making them less likely to bother to vote in the next election.

  • Theorizing a new radicalism: Henry Giroux on how to change the world


    In the overlapping realms of cultural studies and critical theory, few scholars have made a more significant impact upon contemporary educational theory than Henry Giroux. In 2002, the American-Canadian academic was named by the British publisher Routledge as one of the top fifty educational thinkers of the modern period.

  • Jim Naylor: The Fate of Labour Socialism


    Professor James Naylor talks about his exciting new book: The Fate of Labour Socialism: The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Dream of a Working-Class Future. The book is a fundamental reexamination of the CCF and Canadian working-class politics in the 1930s, one that will help historians better understand Canada’s political, intellectual, and labour history.

  • The blind alleys of “Generation Screwed”


    Much has been made about the experience of millennials in the contemporary economy. And this isn’t without reason: wages are low, education is expensive, housing is inaccessible and finding secure employment is increasingly difficult. There does need to be a discussion in our society about intergenerational inequality, including within labour unions and left movements.

  • More smoke than substance in Canadian plans


    While media attention in the global North has focused on the Swiss referendum, some of the most interesting BI projects and plans are in the global South, from Brazil to South Africa. And not all are government initiatives. The charity is planning on distributing a BI to 6,000 Kenyan villagers over 10 years in a historic program expected to cost $30 million.

  • Taking Basic Income beyond the market: The Unconditional Autonomy Allowance


    The concept of a partially demonetized Basic Income disbursed in the form of vouchers for goods and services in addition to cash amounts in both national and local currencies is an interesting angle on Basic Income that warrants further consideration as a roadmap for how to “free our time and minds from subjection to capitalism” while moving in an ecologically sustainable direction.

  • A friendly disagreement


    The Left has long been divided on the issue of Basic Income. The argument recurs every generation or so. In the last few years it has resumed throughout much of the global North, especially in the wake of campaigns and initiatives in Switzerland and Finland, for example. And the debate is now ablaze in Canada.

  • The dead end of wage labour


    An adequate basic income for all is, in this sense, a good starting point for the Left to renew its assault on compulsory wage labour. The organization of work could be freed up to take on more cooperative, decentralized and democratic forms in which workers could decide for themselves what work is desired and useful.

  • Winnipeg conference looks at real-life experiences


    The North American Basic Income Group held its 15th annual congress in Winnipeg on May 13 to 16. The event brought together activists and researchers with experience of poverty from across North America to discuss an idea that is gaining momentum as a tool for poverty reduction: Basic Income, a program which would pay a guaranteed amount monthly or annually to every adult member of society.

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