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ARP

Economic Crisis

  • China’s Economy: Powerful But Vulernable

    China’s rapid growth has produced prosperity and reduced poverty. It has also generated less wholesome economic, social, and ecological consequences which are now catching up with it, making the much-vaunted Chinese model increasingly less attractive for developing economies.

  • Climate Change and the Crisis of Stranded Fossil Fuel Assets

    PlaceThe world’s oil, gas, and coal companies would incur what the Financial Times recently described as “breathtaking” losses if they’re not allowed to extract and burn their enormous reserves. In total, fossil fuel CO2 emissions contained in untapped reserves are estimated at 2910 gigatonnes or nearly three trillion metric tons.

  • Meet the New Boss, Same as the Old Boss

    Canadian economist and author Jim Stanford lists seven ways in which the evolution of work is reflecting a fundamental continuity with long-standing labour practices and relationships that are as old as capitalism itself. To improve the quality and compensation of work, we need to understand – and where necessary confront – those core features.

  • Canada’s Tax System Should Oppose Inequality, Not Subsidize the Rich

    Successive Canadian governments have treated taxes like a problem that can only be fixed through tax cuts, with more slashes promised from all sides during every election. Imagine the investments we could have made by now if governments had approached taxes not as a problem, but as a solution. Progressive tax policy has a significant role to play in addressing our country’s most pressing challenges, from the ongoing climate emergency to inequality’s seemingly unending expansion.

  • The War on the Poor in the Age of Austerity

    Even in a rich country like Canada, the neoliberal decades have seen a huge intensification of the rate of exploitation. Industrial jobs have been moved offshore, unions have been weakened, low wage precarious work has proliferated and the social infrastructure has been battered. A key component of the attack on social programs and public services has been the reduction of income support for unemployed, sick and disabled people.

  • World’s 500 Richest People Gained $1.2 Trillion in Wealth in 2019

    The 500 richest people in the world, all of whom are billionaires, gained a combined $1.2 trillion in wealth in 2019, further exacerbating inequities that have not been seen since the late 1920s. That’s according to a new Bloomberg analysis published on December 27, which found that the planet’s 500 richest people saw their collective net worth soar by 25 percent to $5.9 trillion over the last year.

  • Why the ‘Ok Boomer’ phenomenon is short-sighted

    The “Ok Boomer” meme, which many young people are using online as a rebuttal against out-of-touch baby boomers, taps into frustrations disproportionately experienced by millennials and Generation Zers—particularly in Canada’s most unaffordable cities. Unfortunately, however, the meme also represents a discourse that ignores the many older people experiencing poverty, discrimination and hardship.

  • Global Economic Volatility and Socio-Political Reactions

    Trade and currency wars, financial volatility and economic turbulence are now the most important features of the world economy. The elements of a new international financial crisis are in place. Although we do not know when it will break out, it is unavoidable, and its impact on world economy will be as significant as the 1880s-90s, 1930s-40s and more recent 2008-09 meltdowns.

  • The future of the global economy hinges on four games of chicken

    The good news is that in the four scenarios above, each side is still talking to the other, or may be open to dialogue under some face-saving conditions. The bad news is that all sides are still very far from any kind of agreement. Worse, there are big egos in the mix, some of whom might prefer to crash than be perceived as a chicken. The future of the global economy thus hinges on four games of dare that could go either way.

  • Why a wealth tax must be part of any plan to end income inequality in Canada

    If members of the billionaire class support a wealth tax on the grounds that it numbs adversarial attitudes towards wealthy elites—and slows the pace of growing inequality so that the rich can carry on their businesses as usual—is it likely, on its own, to be an effective way of serving the long-term interests of poor and working people?

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