Articles Quebec

  • Quebec’s election frontrunners are frozen in climate denialism

    Canadian Politics

    More than 70 people perished in Quebec this summer during an unprecedented heat wave that sent the mercury soaring across the world. Welcome to the new reality: a decade ago, the Global Humanitarian Forum had already estimated casualties in the hundreds of thousands each year as a result of climate change, with hundreds of millions more suffering serious harm.

  • A look at far-right groups in Québec

    Quebec

    The various right-wing extremist groups operating in Québec are not necessarily all in conflict with one another. In fact, together they can appeal to a broad constituency for hate and can recruit people based on their favourite target and preferred type of activism: anti-gay, Islamophobic, anti-Semitic, arm-chair fascists, grassroots fascists, and so on.

  • Québec Solidaire Clarifies Its Support for Independence

    Quebec

    Québec solidaire leaned over backwards to accommodate Option nationale’s concerns and it remains to be seen how this will affect the party’s functioning in the near future. Clearly, the integration of those ON members who will now join QS will stimulate some useful internal debate. With the fusion, the former ON has been won to a party that proudly proclaims its progressive goals and program – and does not pretend that Quebec independence is neither right nor left

  • National Struggle and Class Struggle in Catalonia and Quebec: Complementary or Contradictory?

    Europe

    The fight for control of our national fate, our resources, our environment and our industry cannot be successful without challenging the control by the ruling classes. That inevitably means looking beyond Quebec’s borders and calling on the working people in the rest of Canada to support our fight for social justice against the equally inevitable intervention of the Canadian state and its financial institutions.

  • Quebec’s Niqab ban is a shameful sop to nativist voters

    Quebec

    This law will no doubt be subject to a barrage of court challenges. But whether or not it survives, it will do great damage, as Couillard once seemed to understand. “Words can be knives slashing at people’s consciousness,” the premier said after the shooting. “We need to act together to show the direction we want our society to evolve.”

  • Québec solidaire gains ground

    Quebec

    The PQ has outlived its “best before” date. It no longer has anything to offer other than an appeal to defeat the (admittedly heinous) Liberal government of Philippe Couillard. Meanwhile Québec solidaire is gaining ground. It now has 15,000 members, including 5,000 who have joined since Gabriel came aboard. It is becoming the party of unity and hope for enlightened voters in Québec.

  • Québecers mobilize against intolerance and exclusion

    Quebec

    The testimony gathered by media covering the January shooting at a Québec City mosque brings to light a somber situation. According to a representative of that city’s Muslim community, many no longer go to mosques for fear of being identified, while some women have stopped wearing hijabs, hiding their faith for fear of being fired from their jobs. (As one of them put it, “It’s enough that I am black; that is something I cannot hide.”)

  • Québec solidaire: No to an electoral pact with the PQ, Yes to a united front against austerity

    Quebec

    The debate on these options in the party in recent months has revealed a deep and wholly understandable reluctance of QS members to any association with the PQ which, they say, would tend to mask Québec solidaire’s identity as a progressive alternative to the neoliberal parties, including the PQ, and undermine the QS attempt to build alliances between the party and “some social and political movements that share the same inclusive vision.”

  • Major decisions face Québec solidaire at its forthcoming congress

    Canadian Politics

    Quebec’s broad party of the left, Québec solidaire (QS), will open a four-day congress on May 19 in Montréal. The delegates face a challenging agenda. It includes the final stage of adoption of the party’s detailed program, a process begun eight years ago; discussion of possible alliances with other parties and some social movements including a proposed fusion with another pro-independence party, Option nationale; and renewal of the party’s top leadership.

  • Canada’s 150th: A Québécois View

    Canadian Politics

    So Canada celebrates two national holidays: the United Kingdom’s and the one called Canada Day, referring to “Confederation,” (which was a confederation in name only), on July 1. Neither has any relation to its independence. Canada does not celebrate the date of its accession to independence, which legally occurred on December 11, 1931 through the adoption of a British law called the Statute of Westminster. Why?

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