Articles Education

  • KPMG misses point of university education

    Education

    Maybe the most troubling aspect of the Pallister-KPMG idea of a university is its clear intention to micromanage post-secondary education, focusing on immediately measurable productivity that undermines academics’ ability to do basic research. In order to serve its function of innovation, criticism and co-operation, a university requires a stable and independent environment.

  • The U of M stands at a historic crossroads

    Education

    Turning education into a high-priced commodity is constricting access once again just when greater numbers of women, minorities, and Indigenous people have begun to access it. These are among the reasons why UMFA supports low or no fees, greater public funding of post-secondary higher education, and a return to universities’ core educational, researching, and training functions.

  • The Munk School of Global Affairs and University Propaganda

    Education

    The Munk School of Global Affairs reveals much about the state of foreign-policy debate in this country. Among 35 million Canadians, the University of Toronto would be hard pressed to find a less credible source of support for the study of international affairs. Peter Munk is a right wing ideologue and mining magnate with an important personal stake in a particular foreign policy.

  • Free Tuition: An Antidote to Elitism

    Education

    This November 2, students from Victoria to St. John’s will take to the streets for the Canadian Federation of Students’ (CFS) National Day of Action for tuition-free post-secondary education. Why free tuition? We are sleepwalking backwards towards a time when our post-secondary institutions were closed shops, reserved for children of the elite and dramatic change is needed now.

  • Theorizing a new radicalism: Henry Giroux on how to change the world

    Culture

    In the overlapping realms of cultural studies and critical theory, few scholars have made a more significant impact upon contemporary educational theory than Henry Giroux. In 2002, the American-Canadian academic was named by the British publisher Routledge as one of the top fifty educational thinkers of the modern period.

  • Spring 2015 Anti-Austerity Movement in Quebec: A Critical Retrospective of the Organizing

    Education

    A wet snow fell in Montreal, Quebec, on March 21, 2015. Thousands of people walked in a demonstration through the streets that afternoon and 38 000 students went on strike two days later, March 23rd, launching a much-anticipated movement, Printemps 2015 (Spring 2015). Spring 2015 was to be a mass mobilization in Quebec against austerity and fossil fuels.

  • The Public Value of Public Sector Strikes

    Education

    Will collectively produced wealth be used to enable students to work and learn free from the burden of wondering how to pay the rent, or will it be siphoned of by tax cuts, leaving students to pay a higher bill for access to institutions whose priorities are less and less determined by academics and students and more by unaccountable owners of money-value wealth?

  • Austerity Strangles Ontario: the TA strikes in Context

    Education

    Bringing together these strikes with the burgeoning OPS contract fight, and showing up at OPSEU’s numerous rallies and info pickets, Ontario workers can begin to build some real solidarity and power capable of taking on the Liberals.

  • Noam Chomsky: American Socrates

    Education

    The force of Noam Chomsky’s intellect terrifies the corporate state—which is why the commercial media and much of the academic establishment treat him as a pariah. He is the Socrates of our time.

  • If I Had a Hammer: David Rovics’ songs of social significance

    Canadian Politics

    We would do well to add If I Had a Hammer to our political playlists and to learn from David Rovics’ songs generally as we build our movements to bring about social change.

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