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Asia

  • Why America’s economic war on China is failing

    Both the Republican Party and the Democratic Party are committed to a policy that will not cause China to surrender to the ambitions of the United States. Whether or not the US can backtrack from this policy orientation and begin a dialogue with China remains to be seen; doing so would be, of course, desirable.

  • Why a reset of Canada-China relations is more urgent than ever

    Is the surest path to victory in the Green Party leadership race, as Georgia Straight editor Charlie Smith suggests, to “explicitly support Hong Kong’s right to self-determination and declare unwavering support for the independence of Taiwan”? The world doesn’t need a second Cold War. Calling for an end to Canada’s One China policy pushes us further down that path.

  • The difference between the US and China’s response to COVID-19 is staggering

    The United States continues to have the largest total number of cases of COVID-19. The government continues to flounder as the number of cases escalates. Not one state in the country seems immune to the spread of the disease. Meanwhile, in China, ever since the virus was crushed in Wuhan, the government merely has had to contain small-scale localized outbreaks

  • Canada’s relationship with China rooted in a century-old tradition of imperial violence

    While most of the media frame conflict with China in Manichean, us-versus-them terms, past and present actions by Canada and other Western states reveal a centuries-old pattern of colonialism, imperialism, military threats, diplomatic isolation and other forms of aggressive behaviour aimed at weakening and ‘containing’ the world’s most dynamic and populous economy.

  • Canada’s membership in the Five Eyes alliance promoting conflict with China

    In recent weeks movements in different countries have toppled statues and put the police and other institutions upholding systemic racism on the defensive. Yet, amidst unprecedented protests against racism, there has been remarkably little interest in the white supremacist foreign policy alliance currently driving conflict with China.

  • Trump is igniting a cold war with China to try to win re-election

    Trump is a symptom as well as a cause of the polarisation of the US political system, more divided now than at any time since the Civil War ended in 1865. Yet the decline of the US is much greater than the rise of China, significant though that may be, and it is naive to imagine that Beijing will simply displace Washington at the top table.

  • Kerala’s social policies are the best prevention against future pandemics

    Kerala, India’s communist state, has managed to flatten the curve with forceful measures. They activated controls at airports and train stations to detect the entry of the virus into the state, and established temporary quarantine shelters to lodge tourists and non-residents. This was followed by aggressive testing, contact tracing, long quarantine periods, shelters for migrant workers, and cooked meals for those most in need.

  • Lessons from Taiwan during COVID-19: Between politics and collective experience

    What will the post-coronavirus world look like? History tells us that in times of crisis, large corporations and the most vulnerable in society seek refuge under the protection of the state. The 2008 financial crisis already made clear that markets alone cannot drive competitiveness and prosperity. On the contrary, state intervention is crucial.

  • ‘The Poland of northeast Asia’: Mongolia’s lithium frontier

    The popular argument that lithium is necessary to transition vehicles away from fossil fuels usually doesn’t go deeper to critique the influence of Canadian and US companies on economic priorities and policies in those countries with substantial lithium deposits. For at least two decades, mineral prospecting in Mongolia has gone hand-in-hand with neoliberal policy intervention, and the looming lithium boom signals that this will only intensify.

  • China’s economy: Powerful but vulernable

    China’s economy is often presented as a powerful engine. This is, however, only one face of it. It has also been marked by vulnerabilities, and these have become more obvious over time, as the costs of high-speed growth have rebounded on the country, giving rise to social tensions that are straining the capacity of the reigning Communist Party to contain them.

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