• Canadian Politics

    Major decisions face Québec solidaire at its forthcoming congress

    Quebec’s broad party of the left, Québec solidaire (QS), will open a four-day congress on May 19 in Montréal. The delegates face a challenging agenda. It includes the final stage of adoption of the party’s detailed program, a process begun eight years ago; discussion of possible alliances with other parties and some social movements including a proposed fusion with another pro-independence party, Option nationale; and renewal of the party’s top leadership.

  • Europe

    Labour party’s plan to nationalise mail, rail and energy firms

    Labour’s election package will be built around Corbyn’s “10 pledges” from last year’s annual conference. That focused on infrastructure to help create “a million good quality jobs”, a promise to build half a million council homes, getting rid of zero-hours contracts, ending privatisation in the NHS and funding social care, the national education service, more focus on climate change, renationalisation and a more progressive tax system.

  • Globalization

    Why Aren’t Corporations Required to be Socially Responsible?

    Imagine if a corporation had to justify its existence beyond making money for capitalists. What would happen if a social balance sheet, as well as financial one, had to be filed every year and companies continually in a deficit position would eventually disappear? Consider Barrick Gold. Would the world be better off if the world’s largest gold miner ceased to exist?

  • Canadian Politics

    How will Jagmeet Singh Shape the Federal NDP Leadership Race?

    The energy Singh brings, and the urgency he might be creating among other candidates, could bring a more competitive tone to the debates that have thus far lacked major differentiations between the candidates. With the CPC leadership race ending this week, the NDP leadership race will be getting increased attention, and is really just beginning.

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  • 2012

    The Birth of Medicare

    Medicare was born in Saskatchewan on July 1, 1962. It would be the first government-controlled, universal, comprehensive single-payer medical insurance plan in North America. It was a difficult birth. The North American medical establishment and the entire insurance industry were determined to stop Medicare in its tracks. They feared it would become popular and spread, and they were right. Within 10 years all of Canada was covered by a medical insurance system based on the Saskatchewan plan, and no serious politician would openly oppose it.