• Canadian Politics

    Open Letter to Jagmeet Singh: NDP’s reactionary foreign policy positions must be changed

    It is absolutely certain that those Canadians who have taken the trouble to discover the truth about Canada’s minister of foreign affairs are dismayed and perplexed. But where is the NDP on this matter? From what I know, there hasn’t been a word from them on this issue. Mr. Singh, could you possibly do something about this? In this letter I have presented several matters that require the NDP’s attention.

  • Culture

    The Last Jedi is centrist slop masquerading as radical sci-fi

    The Last Jedi offers up a vapid and apolitical thesis that echoes the non-ideology of Clintonite, Third Way-obsessed technocrats — that there’s no longer such thing as “good” or “evil,” traditions and histories can be discarded, and the primary commitment of a “rebel” is to non-material notions such as love and friendship over any semblance of political conviction.

  • Human Rights

    Justice for Hassan Diab and the Unbearable Banality of Evil

    The next few weeks will hopefully see Dr. Diab home with his family and with the large number of people who have worked for his release and full exoneration. Understanding his ordeal should motivate fundamental change to Canada’s extradition law and yield insights about the sociology and politics of injustice. Questions arise about how and why the banality of a small number of people can wreak havoc on the justice system and cause torment to many.

  • Environment

    Memo to Jacobin: Ecomodernism is not ecosocialism

    Is Jacobin becoming a voice for ecomodernism with a leftish veneer? I hope not, but the signs aren’t good. The first book in the new Jacobin Book Series, Four Futures, by Peter Frase, offers future scenarios based on science fiction movies and books: as Antony Galluzzo says in a review, this approach allows Frase to ignore “the technological, ecological, or social feasibility of [his] predictions.”

Advertisement

  • 2016

    Marxist scholar Ellen Meiksins Wood had a towering intellect

    Barely five feet tall but considered an intellectual giant, Marxist scholar and political science professor Ellen Meiksins Wood was instrumental in making Toronto’s York University a centre for the radical critique of social and political thought toward the end of the 20th century.