Articles Canadian Politics

  • NDP Leadership Race: A Labour-Themed Debate Brings Most Substance Yet

    Canadian Politics

    Much is still at stake for 2019, and while Trudeau remains strong, his father in 1972 lost his Trudeaumania majority, nearly lost power altogether, and had to depend on the David Lewis NDP to keep it. Even if 2019 doesn’t bring an NDPer into 24 Sussex, the chosen leader could wield immense power and influence.

  • Time to Revitalize the Anti-War Movement

    Canadian Politics

    Beneath the velvet glove of the Liberal government lies the iron fist of the Canadian ruling class… the same people that Harper worked for, the same interests that try to push down wages and working conditions, the same corporate elite that destroys our environment, violates treaties with indigenous nations and ruthlessly exploits working people around the globe. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

  • Fourth NDP Leadership Debate: A New Format Sparks Real Debate and Discussion

    Canadian Politics

    While Westminster might feel awfully distant from Canada, the CCF-NDP and Canadian labour movement has been deeply influenced by Britain. Much like how the Labour Party provided examples to the CCF-NDP last century, so too can Corbyn provide a basic roadmap towards socialist relevance today. As with the previous recaps, we will look at each candidate individually before offering general closing remarks.

  • BC Election Post-Mortem: Sixteen Perspectives on the Campaign and its Aftermaths

    Canadian Politics

    After sixteen years in power, British Columbia’s Liberal government is teetering on the brink of collapse. On May 31, 2017, the BC NDP inked a deal with the BC Greens and set in motion a process that will all but certainly end with the toppling of Christy Clark’s premiership. We asked sixteen researchers and organizers to reflect on the campaign that got us here, and what might come next.

  • Third NDP Leadership Debate: Two new Contestants and a bit more Conflict

    Canadian Politics

    Ultimately, the debate was the most passionate one to date, and offered the biggest hints of disagreement and conflict between the six candidates. Nevertheless, the process was a cordial one, with contenders giving credit to one another for the work they had done on various key issues, and still beginning numerous points by agreeing with the previous speaker.

  • How will Jagmeet Singh Shape the Federal NDP Leadership Race?

    Canadian Politics

    The energy Singh brings, and the urgency he might be creating among other candidates, could bring a more competitive tone to the debates that have thus far lacked major differentiations between the candidates. With the CPC leadership race ending this week, the NDP leadership race will be getting increased attention, and is really just beginning.

  • Major decisions face Québec solidaire at its forthcoming congress

    Canadian Politics

    Quebec’s broad party of the left, Québec solidaire (QS), will open a four-day congress on May 19 in Montréal. The delegates face a challenging agenda. It includes the final stage of adoption of the party’s detailed program, a process begun eight years ago; discussion of possible alliances with other parties and some social movements including a proposed fusion with another pro-independence party, Option nationale; and renewal of the party’s top leadership.

  • Canada’s Effort to suppress “Popular Protests” against Israeli Occupation

    Canadian Politics

    Around 1,000 Palestinians held in Israeli prisons have been on hunger strike since April 17. In the occupied West Bank thousands of protesters have taken to the streets and gone on strike in solidarity with the 6,500 Palestinians currently imprisoned by Israel. The Canadian media should cover the prisoners’ hunger strike and its challenge to PA security cooperation with Israel. Even better, it ought to report on Canada’s role in entrenching Israel’s 50-year-old occupation.

  • Canada’s 150th: A Québécois View

    Canadian Politics

    So Canada celebrates two national holidays: the United Kingdom’s and the one called Canada Day, referring to “Confederation,” (which was a confederation in name only), on July 1. Neither has any relation to its independence. Canada does not celebrate the date of its accession to independence, which legally occurred on December 11, 1931 through the adoption of a British law called the Statute of Westminster. Why?

  • Canada and the pirates of the Caribbean

    Canadian Politics

    Canadian imperialism in the Caribbean is no joke. By the early 1900s, Canadian policy supported annexing the British Empire’s Caribbean possessions (the various islands as well as today’s Belize and Guyana). At the end of WWI, Ottawa asked the Imperial War Cabinet if it could take possession of the British West Indies as compensation for Canada’s defence of the Empire. London balked.

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