Articles Reviews

  • Review: I Am Not Your Negro

    Now and then, and despite its capitalist and racial biases, our culture throws up something that can speak quite eloquently and uniquely about the times we’re living through. In this case, I’m referring to an amazing documentary film that has been released recently, I Am Not Your Negro, directed by Raoul Peck, an acclaimed Haitian director with major films to his credit. This latest work is well worth seeing and has been well received here.

  • Essays on Indigenous struggles offer both insight and oversight

    Indigenous occupations are thus not simply a breach of Canadian legal orders but also a reassertion of Indigenous law. Unfortunately, too often the focus of Blockades or Breakthroughs on intricate conflicts within Indigenous communities obscures the larger contest with colonialism that underlies Indigenous peoples’ adoption of direct action.

  • ‘People’s history’ brought to life with voices from vibrant era

    A Future Without Hate or Need is largely a “people’s history,” social history from the bottom up. Perhaps it is the “warmth of the ghetto,” a once-familiar phrase, that makes this study of leaders and followers seem whole cloth. Too rarely do we see these kinds of precious, personal insights into the lives of activists outside of oral histories.

  • Reopen Bethlehem!

    Open Bethlehem reveals how policies developed by the Canadian government in regard to First Nations evolved over centuries, from decimation to assimilation, to marginalization and finally, segregation. This came to inspire efforts by the governments of both South Africa and Israel to suppress the human rights and citizenship of its indigenous inhabitants.

  • Transnationalism and Italian anarchists in Canada, 1915-1940

    Travis Tomchuck’s Transnational Radicals focuses on the movement of Italian anarchists from Italy to Canada and the U.S. and back to Italy to show the long-term contours of the Italian anarchist movement and its activities across borders, thus the term “transnational.” Transnationalism is the process by which migrants create and sustain social relations that link their societies of origin and societies of settlement.

  • Mapping the vocabulary of the radical Left

    This wide spectrum of essays offers richly grounded and concrete tools for navigating anticapitalist struggle. For example, John Bellamy Foster’s and Patrick Bond’s respective chapters on nature and sustainability provide conceptual and historical clarity for any political project that considers environmental destruction and the limits of natural resources, time, labour and money.

  • Comic collection inspired by everyday heroes

    Edited by the Graphic History Collective, this compilation of comics presents readers with an alternative narrative to the dominant comic book discourse. Our militaristic, macho, male heroes are replaced with people like Québécois union activist Madeleine Parent, or Indigenous workers fighting for the land in B.C., or the women who fought hard labour battles in the retail sector.

  • Mother Tareka addresses the elephants in the room

    Elephants is the perfect soundtrack for the times we live in. Funk’s influences range from funk, hip-hop, Afrobeat and Arabic poetry. The breadth of styles adds several layers to Elephants. It’s not simply hip-hop with Afro-beat horn lines or a funk rhythm section with rapping overtop; instead, each style plays a role in forming the overall sound.

  • The Propaganda System in Canada

    Propaganda is only as good as the processes through which it is concealed. Traditional examples of propaganda — the cult of personality, the political commissar, and the threat of the work camp (or worse) — were blunt and easy. They reflected a political climate where the threat of violent repression allowed for a less sophisticated regime of mass persuasion.

  • Ava DuVernay’s ‘13th’ a must-see exposé of mass incarceration in the US

    Avu DuVernay’s latest documentary 13th comes at an important junction in American history. The 2016 presidential elections confirmed that divisions of race and class continue to be central and defining features of contemporary US society. Donald Trump ran on a platform of open bigotry, courting a reactionary following and emboldening the so-called ‘alt-right’ movement.

Page 1 of 12