Articles Latin America and the Caribbean

  • Canada’s ongoing complicity with exploitive extraction schemes

    Canadian Business

    One hundred and seventy-six years on, the Canadian state today remains more committed to — and dependent upon — the mining business than any other government in the world. Three-quarters of the world’s mining companies today are headquartered in Canada. The bulk of this investment comes from outside of Canada, while the majority of the production it finances also occurs abroad.

  • IMF refuses Barbuda debt relief after hurricane, Cuba dispatches medical staff across Caribbean

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    The IMF’s refusal to converse about funds owed by the tiny Caribbean island was made clear by Christopher Lane, the financial institution’s special representative to the UN. “Our general view is that we’d rather put new money in than to have a moratorium,” Lane said. He exemplified the IMF’s position by stating that the institution may borrow funds from the US and loan them to Antigua.

  • Correcting the Lies About Venezuela

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    Fed up with these fair-weather friends and their critiques which recycle corporate news propaganda, some defenders of Venezuela have come with articles clarifying the stakes and calling the so-called “left” to account. Among the disaffected is Venezuelan-American lawyer Eva Golinger, the author of The Chávez Code: Cracking US Intervention in Venezuela and self-described friend and advisor to Hugo Chávez.

  • Venezuela: Target of Economic Warfare

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    The current economic situation Venezuelans are going through result from political actions undertaken by those who want to seize power of a country that has the largest oil reserve, the second largest gas reserve, and the largest freshwater reserve, gold and coltan in the world. They intend to impede the success of a system other than capitalism.

  • US Occupation of Venezuela Has Already Begun and Is Being Conducted by ExxonMobil

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    ExxonMobil’s strategy is long-term, directed at the entire continent and has Venezuela as its primary objective. It is not in vain that a crew of business elites has assumed the reins of U.S. foreign policy today. ExxonMobil would undoubtedly be very pleased to achieve its plans and retake the Caribbean by overthrowing the Venezuelan government,

  • The Left and Venezuela

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    During the last two months Venezuela has been faced with a terrible wave of violence. It has already resulted in more than 60 deaths along with looted schools, burned public buildings, destroyed public transportation and emptied hospitals. The major media, however, simply engage in a running stream of gruesome denunciations of the government.

  • Time for the “International Left” to Take a Stand on Venezuela

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    The international left does not even need to take a position on whether the proposed constitutional assembly or negotiations with the opposition is the best way to resolve the current crisis. Opposing intervention and disseminating information on what is actually happening in Venezuela, though, are the two things where non-Venezuelans can play a constructive role.

  • Brazil in Crisis and the Challenges for the Left

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    With the victory of the right wing in Argentina in 2015, Venezuela in crisis, and Brazil at a boiling point, the only way forward for the left in the region will be to engage in a process of deep reinvention. To do this, it will have to draw on its most democratic impulses, combating the authoritarian character of the new right. This will also mean exploring new alliances and political formations.

  • What Is to Be Done in Venezuela?

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    Maduro has responded to extremists in the opposition by assuming everyone in the opposition is an extremist, presiding over an ineffective and incoherent mix of distributivist carrots and repressive sticks, aimed not so much at consolidating his personal power as at digging in a besieged and out-of-touch revolutionary bureaucracy. The country is locked into an impasse, which might only be broken, many fear, by civil war.

  • Canada and the pirates of the Caribbean

    Canadian Politics

    Canadian imperialism in the Caribbean is no joke. By the early 1900s, Canadian policy supported annexing the British Empire’s Caribbean possessions (the various islands as well as today’s Belize and Guyana). At the end of WWI, Ottawa asked the Imperial War Cabinet if it could take possession of the British West Indies as compensation for Canada’s defence of the Empire. London balked.

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