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BTL 2

Social Movements

  • Online Activism During COVID-19: A Case Study in Rent Strikes

    Historically, rent strikes have resulted in successful outcomes and forced governments to amend issues faced by tenants. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the symptoms of an ongoing collective struggle among renters, and brought to the fore many of the systemic challenges they face. Will the Canadian state tend to them, or leave them to worsen?

  • Revitalizing Left Internationalism

    In concert with people around the world doing good work, we can resist despair and isolation. We can build strong relations, individually and collectively, across movements and borders. We can recognize our responsibilities, rooted where we are, in getting one another free. We can win a new world by winning across the world.

  • Struggles in the Shadow of the Pandemic

    The idea that a better world is possible can’t take hold if those who run the present one appear invincible. The pandemic has unleashed a crisis that poses the gravest dangers but opens up the real possibility of transforming the decades of defensive struggle against neoliberal attack into an offensive challenge to the whole capitalist system.

  • We Need a Citizens’ Assembly For a Just Transition

    The COVID-19 crisis presents a remarkable opportunity to realize a post-pandemic Canada in the interests of the many through unity and action. To achieve fundamental change, we need to find a unified voice and to coalesce around and embrace a historic project of democratic decision-making. Are we up to it?

  • ‘Caremongering’ groups show what social movements can accomplish in a pandemic

    Torontonians and Canadians looking to make a difference in responses to COVID-19 should keep these lessons in mind as they volunteer their time and resources to help those most vulnerable. Our kindness is only as effective as the politics that backs it, and we all deserve to live full, secure, and dignified lives even after this pandemic passes.

  • It’s time to meet the new generation of climate leaders

    Teenagers are not expected to care about anything that expands further than the world of their high school. They are not expected to spend their winter holidays learning about the environment. They certainly aren’t expected to mobilize the masses. That is, unless, you’re referring to Elliott Anderson.

  • Bottom-Up Strategizing for Social Change

    Increasingly, activists and organizers are discussing the question, “What’s your theory of change?” For the most part, this is positive. As climate justice organizer and activist-scholar Jen Gobby explains, a theory of change lays out our thinking about “how we will make change in the world and why we think it will work.”

  • Why is Jagmeet Singh ignoring progressive voices on Palestine?

    It’s no secret that many members of the NDP think that Canada’s historically progressive party needs a makeover in its relationship to Israel and Palestine. Nowhere was this clearer than at the party’s 2018 policy convention in Ottawa where the leadership blocked a massively supported resolution in favour of Palestinian rights from hitting the convention floor. Remarks made recently by NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh signal another alarming backslide when it comes to standing up for human rights and international law in Israel and Palestine.

  • Canada Must Not Suppress Free Speech on Israel

    In December, a member of the Ontario legislature introduced a private member’s bill calling for the IHRA definition to be adopted in that province. The bill has already passed its first reading. Clearly, we have our work cut out for us. But we are encouraged by the fact that our members and allies understand the gravity of this matter. As a result, we have collectively enjoyed some major successes in defending freedom of speech with regard to the Palestinian cause.

  • Indian Government Going to War Against Its Own People

    On December 13, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights released a powerful statement that criticized India’s new citizenship law. This “fundamentally discriminatory” Citizenship (Amendment) Act of 2019 would expedite citizenship for persecuted religious minorities from India’s neighboring countries. But in the list of those minorities, it names only Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis and Christians. It does not mention Muslims.

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