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Our Times 3

Yves Engler

  • When will the Trudeau government finally end its embrace of Juan Guaidó?

    The Trudeau government’s policy of backing Venezuela’s self-declared “interim president” Juan Guaidó, an individual without an electoral mandate or control over any government institution, has backfired spectacularly. One can understand why the incoherent and belligerent Trump administration would continue with this farce, but why are the Liberals still going along with it?

  • Why isn’t the NDP questioning the largest military procurement in Canadian history?

    Amidst growing criticism, NDP Defence Critic Randall Garrison has said nothing regarding the runaway costs of the Canadian Surface Combatant project, the secrecy surrounding it, or the offensive weaponry set to be equipped on the warships. What is the point of having a defence critic if they are unwilling to question or challenge the largest military procurement in Canadian history?

  • Winning social justice victories means bringing power to the table

    Winning social justice victories isn’t about making nice with the powerful. Rather, it requires bringing some power to the table. Fortunately for the anti-nuclear movement its latent power is a broadly supportive public. To turn that into policy, activists need to rile up public opinion and channel it politically. If that upsets some important people that’s a reflection of their priorities, not our tactics.

  • Canada is choosing corporate property rights over the health of billions

    Why is the Trudeau government not supporting sensible policy to help vaccinate millions of people living in the poorest continent in the Global South? This is likely because Ottawa is in thrall to big business and the interests of the already wealthy. Surely, ending the COVID-19 pandemic must be a top priority. The faster the entire world’s population is vaccinated, the better off we all will be.

  • Canadian media’s double standard on ‘foreign influence’ has become painfully clear

    Lately, the Globe and Mail, Canada’s ‘paper of record,’ has been so gripped with anti-Chinese fervour that it has become blind to a blatant double standard. Contrasting the newspaper’s reporting on Chinese influence in Canada with its coverage of the Israel lobby highlights the increasingly Sinophobic nature of its journalism and commentary.

  • The red poppy is not a commitment to peace—it is a celebration of militarism

    By focusing exclusively on ‘our’ side, Remembrance Day poppies reinforce a sense that Canada’s cause is righteous. At worst, they create an ideological climate that supports never-ending militarism and future wars. To remember all victims of war, there should be nothing wrong with wearing the white poppy of peace, or no poppy at all, as a rebuke to fervent nationalism and the implicit support of militarism at home and abroad.

  • Canadian military support for nukes must be met with popular resistance

    To counteract pressure from the military, substantial grassroots mobilization is required to force the government to fulfill its expressed support for nuclear disarmament and the “rules-based international order.” For Canada to sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, we need to both rekindle the anti-nuclear movement that has garnered mainstream success and revitalize anti-war and anti-imperialist activism.

  • Bolivia’s election result is a major blow to Trudeau’s foreign policy

    The recent victory of Bolivia’s Movement Toward Socialism (MAS) party on October 18 was a rejection of last year’s Canadian-backed coup against Evo Morales, an event that resulted in a year of violent repression by the military-backed interim government. The vote was also a blow to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s complicity in the efforts of the United States to overthrow left-wing governments across Latin America.

  • Why is the Israeli military still recruiting in Canada?

    There’s a Canadian law that makes it illegal for the armed forces of any foreign state to recruit soldiers within our borders, but you’d never know it the way Israel and its supporters operate within this country. For three quarters of a century Canadians have been recruited inside this country to fight in Israel’s military. Finally, however, there is an organized effort to stop this practice.

  • Canada’s military footprint in Africa is an extension of US imperialism

    Which is more believable as motivation to send soldiers to other countries, altruism or self-interest? The Canadian Forces do not train their African counterparts out of a commitment to professionalism or democracy but to extend Canada’s influence on the continent while restoring the national security interests of the United States.

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