Advertisement

CUPE 2021 leaderboard

Yves Engler

  • Why Canada must confront the myths of its imperial past

    Throughout the federal election campaign, Conservative Party leader Erin O’Toole has taken to referencing his time as a student at the Royal Military College of Canada, describing how his education instilled a “sense of determination” that fuelled a commitment to a life of public service. But how many Canadians are aware of the troubling history of the Kingston-based university and its connections to the racism and violence of British imperialism?

  • NDP’s same old foreign policy is a massive disappointment

    The New Democratic Party’s foreign policy and military statements suggest little would change if the party formed government, writes Yves Engler. That’s unfortunate since there’s much that needs to shift in Canada’s relationship to the world. Canadians of conscience shouldn’t be satisfied with being a junior partner in the neoliberal world order and bullying others to follow the dictates of the US empire.

  • Canada’s failure in Afghanistan

    Canada’s biggest military deployment since the Second World War, more than 40,000 Canadian troops fought in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2014. Canada also spent $20 billion on military operations in the country. And while the stated rationale of the war was to neutralize al-Qaeda members and topple the Taliban regime, the latter has now regained control of the country and the influence of jihadist groups will likely intensify.

  • The Lima Group is falling apart

    The Lima Group, a multilateral body formed by mostly reactionary Western Hemisphere governments in the Peruvian capital in 2017 with the goal of instigating regime change in Venezuela through a “peaceful and negotiated solution,” has been dealt a likely fatal blow that ought to elicit serious discussion about Canadian foreign policy in Latin America. Just don’t expect the media or politicians to even mention it.

  • Canada’s fighter jet purchase is a waste of public money—and a disaster for the climate

    In this political moment, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for progressives to argue that resources should be devoted to fighter jets rather than pandemic recovery and mitigating the climate crisis. Perhaps a few hundred more phones calls, emails and tweets could move the NDP to just say no to spending tens of billions of dollars on unnecessary, dangerous, climate destroying fighter jets.

  • Canada helped destabilize Haiti. It’s time for us to back away

    Throughout contemporary history, Washington and Ottawa have supported the most retrograde elements of Haitian society largely out of fear of the alternative: a reformist, pro-poor government that seeks out alternative regional arrangements. Indeed, Canada has a long history of intervening militarily in Haiti. Amidst the current instability, we should seek to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

  • The smear campaign at the centre of the Green Party debacle

    Last week, Annamie Paul added a new chapter to her deception in service of Israeli colonialism and fidelity to former senior adviser Noah Zatzman. On Tuesday, July 6, the Green Party leader told the Globe and Mail that the federal council of the party no longer required her to repudiate Zatzman’s anti-Palestinian smears and threats against Green MPs (as well as other politicians).

  • Canadian media defend Green Party leader as she accuses her critics of racism

    Recently elected leader Annamie Paul has severely divided and damaged the Green Party of Canada, and there have been no public attempts to heal a glaring rift in the membership. If one were to ascribe motives based on her actions, it would seem Paul is aiming to purge the internationalist, anti-racist left from the party—by calling them racists. Sadly, it’s a a tactic much of the media is applauding.

  • Green Party scores own goal with defection of pro-Palestine MP

    Score an own goal for the Green Party’s most pro-Israel members, Noah Zatzman and newly minted leader Annamie Paul. Not only are they responsible for forcing one of their own to cross the floor into the Liberal Party caucus, they exposed their anti-Palestinian bias by conflating criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism and unjustly smearing a colleague who disagreed with their reactionary positions.

  • Why does Canada still support Colombia’s repressive right-wing government?

    While the latest uprising in Colombia is a strike against austerity measures, looked at another way, it is also a reaction to Canadian policies in the region. Indeed, over the past three decades, Ottawa has retained close diplomatic ties to Latin America’s most repressive state and promoted capitalist policies that have contributed to extreme levels of inequality within Colombia.

Page 1 of 13

Browse the Archive