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BTL 2

Yves Engler

  • How Canada’s patronage-driven defence lobby is abetting US arms manufacturers

    To weaken militarism, it is imperative to reduce the financial benefits sloshing around the system. Senior CF and DND officials should be restricted from lobbying for at least five years after leaving the public service and other measures ought to be adopted to weaken the link between the military hierarchy and arms firms.

  • Trudeau government deepens ties to repressive Kuwaiti monarchy

    Trudeau and Sajjan’s recent missions to Kuwait are part of the fallout from Washington’s decision to assassinate Iranian general Qassim Suleimani. After the January 3 killing some Canadian forces in Iraq were withdrawn to the base in Kuwait. Iraq’s parliament passed a resolution demanding foreign soldiers leave the country and Iran threatened to retaliate against US troops in the region.

  • Trudeau government enabling corporate mining exploitation in Africa

    The Trudeau government continues to defend the profits of a few wealthy owners of mining corporations who steal from Africans. Meanwhile, hundreds of millions continue to face the social and environmental impacts of resource extraction, without the supposed economic benefits mining and foreign investment are said to bring.

  • Canada is celebrating the agents of Palestinian misery

    A top diplomat organizing an event to celebrate Canadians fighting for another country’s military ought to generate criticism. Doing so while that force humiliates Palestinians at checkpoints in the West Bank, fires on protesters in Gaza and bombs Syria in violation of international law is an outrage that must be condemned.

  • What is shaping Canada’s foreign policy: human rights, democracy or bankers’ bottom-line?

    The Liberals have said little about hundreds of killings by regimes in Haiti, Honduras, Bolivia, Chile and Colombia, yet they have aggressively condemned rights violations in Venezuela and Nicaragua. Many on the left would say this is because those governments are aligned with Washington, which is true. Yet it is also because they are friendly to corporate Canada. If you want to understand Ottawa’s position on Latin America, listen to what Canadian bankers have to say.

  • On Iran, Canada toes the imperial line

    The Trudeau government could have delisted Iran as a “state sponsor of terror”, or repealed Harper’s Justice for Victims of Terrorism Act. Instead, it didn’t even keep its promise to restart diplomatic relations with Iran. While there is much to dislike about the government in Tehran, progressive-minded, peace-loving Canadians should reject Ottawa’s aggressive anti-Iranian policies.

  • Remembering the Haiti earthquake, 10 years on

    There was an outpouring of empathy and solidarity from ordinary Canadians after the earthquake. But officials in Ottawa saw the disaster as a political crisis to manage and an opportunity to expand their economic and political influence over Haiti. On the tenth anniversary of this solemn occasion it is important to reflect not only on this tragedy but to understand what has been done by Canada’s government in our name.

  • Sun never sets on Canadian military

    Most Canadians would be surprised to learn that the sun never sets on the military their taxes pay for. The scope of the military’s international footprint is hard to square with the idea of a force defending Canada. That’s why military types promote the importance of “forward defence”. The government’s 2017 “Strong, Secure, Engaged: Canada’s Defence Policy” claims Canada has to “actively address threats abroad for stability at home” and that “defending Canada and Canadian interests… requires active engagement abroad.”

  • Canada backs coup against Bolivia’s president

    In yet another example of the Liberals saying one thing and doing another, Justin Trudeau’s government has supported the ouster of Evo Morales. The Liberals’ position on the violent ouster of Bolivia’s first ever Indigenous president stands in stark contrast with their backing of embattled pro-corporate leaders in the region.

  • Trudeau government’s ‘blackface’ in Haiti

    Trudeau is likely ignorant of the social reality his policies in Haiti are entrenching, yet it’s unlikely he understood that blackening his face also flowed from and contributed to centuries of racial subjugation. It was just popular in the elite social circles he operated in. The same can be said of his humiliation of the impoverished black masses in Haiti today.

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