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BTL 4

Christo Aivalis

  • How will Jagmeet Singh shape the federal NDP leadership race?

    The energy Singh brings, and the urgency he might be creating among other candidates, could bring a more competitive tone to the debates that have thus far lacked major differentiations between the candidates. With the CPC leadership race ending this week, the NDP leadership race will be getting increased attention, and is really just beginning.

  • The 2017 Ontario NDP convention: Lessons learned, steps forward

    In June 2014, The Ontario NDP wrapped up a fairly disappointing election. While the results on the surface were acceptable for Andrea Horwath and the ONDP—maintaining their 2011 seat total, and adding one percent of the popular vote—the end result was a Liberal majority government built on the relative collapse of Progressive Conservative support, which was driven by strategic voters looking to reject the politics of extreme austerity.

  • Second NDP leadership debate: With youth issues as backdrop, differences start to emerge

    This time around, the focus on youth issues showcased greater specificity, and thus brought out both different positions, along with divergent means to reach similar ends. The politics of pineapple pizza aside, even the ‘lightning round’ questions were more substantive this time. All of this means that an undecided NDP member was given some guidance about who they may support.

  • First NDP leadership debate: Good introduction, but not a lot of differentiation

    How does Angus materialize his ‘got your back’ philosophy into a platform? How does Julian plan to address free post-secondary schooling in a federalist scheme that gives educational powers to the provinces? How will Ashton determine the parameters of her commitment to greater public ownership? And in what way will Caron structure a Basic Income to ensure working Canadians aren’t quagmired in greater inequality?

  • Justin Trudeau on electoral reform: deception, cynicism, and misrepresentations

    The year 2015 will be the last federal election under the First Past The Post (FPTP) electoral system. This was the promise Justin Trudeau made during the 2015 campaign. But Trudeau’s Liberals have abandoned this campaign plank, based on a cynical series of lies and misrepresentations of their own promise, along with what the actual effect of ER is.

  • Justin Trudeau has to directly critique and resist Trump’s Muslim ban

    One of Trudeau’s key goals as Prime Minister is to promote and defend the interests of all Canadians at home and abroad, regardless of class, creed, race, or gender. And if he doesn’t use Canada’s full diplomatic weight to defend Iranian, Iraqi, Syrian, Yemeni, Sudani, Libyan, and Somalian Canadians, he will have failed in one of his key responsibilities.

  • Looking forward: five predictions for the Canadian Left in 2017

    2016 was a disappointing year for the Left, as we saw the Democratic Party’s attack on Bernie Sanders, the election of Donald Trump, right-wing motivations for Brexit in the United Kingdom, and the intensification of anti-immigrant rhetoric at home and abroad. But with a new year comes new hopes, opportunities and challenges. Here are five predictions for how the Canadian Left can find success going forward.

  • Tax reform for the Canadian Left: balancing ideology and efficiency

    But what must always be at the forefront for Canadian socialists is the balance of vision and action; of philosophy and practicality. We can make some taxes that seem regressive on the outset less so with mechanisms to dull their effects, and we can still explore grander schemes to change how we collect revenue and strive towards a society of equality of opportunity and condition.

  • Young workers: An “entitled” generation without entitlements

    Now more than ever, we have the material wealth to virtually end poverty, unemployment and social injustice, and yet consistently choose to intensify inequality within and between generations. Ultimately, the branding of millennials as lazy and entitled is essential to justify the intensified destruction of the postwar social contract.

  • Basic income: Libertarian wedge or a plank towards a socialist future?

    In recent years, the popularity of a basic Income (BI), has grown. Fittingly, the topic has garnered thoughtful debate and analysis from across the Canadian left, including in the Summer 2016 issue of Canadian Dimension, where the concept was explored both as potential policy, but also as part of a broader philosophical and ideological discussion.

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