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BTL 4

Christo Aivalis

  • Putting public ownership back on the table

    If we are to build a just society, we require a just economy. And while that must include better social programs financed through redistributive taxation, the democratic socialist project is not encompassed by social programs alone; it must concern itself with the democratization of the economy. And while this shouldn’t be done solely through state ownership, public control will nonetheless be a central plank.

  • Workers strike back: Ontario’s minimum wage

    The business backlash to the minimum wage increase has sparked a desire to broadly organize those in low-wage, precarious work, and to reform legislation so as to make that process more feasible. And while the developing news around UNIFOR’s disaffiliation from the Canadian Labour Congress could stymie the collaborate efforts of local activists to push back against the bosses, there is hope that a new era of organization might be just beginning.

  • Net neutrality and the socialist moment

    The fight for Net Neutrality is but the first salvo in a longer battle over the age-old debates about democracy. Capitalists and their ideological brethren have lined up to fight NN as a barrier towards their profit-making enterprise, and socialists can make the case that if capitalism means antagonism to the very concept that manifests a free internet, perhaps the owners of private industry shouldn’t be trusted with other important aspects of our daily lives.

  • Jagmeet Singh’s first major policy opportunity: Tax reform

    It’s been about a month since Jagmeet Singh became the leader of the Federal New Democratic Party on the back of an emphatic—if unexpected—first ballot triumph. Because Singh doesn’t yet have a federal seat, he has been devoting time outside of Parliament, while former leadership competitor Guy Caron is spearheading the NDP’s efforts inside the House of Commons.

  • It’s not just Quebec: The NDP leadership race and racial dog-whistles

    We have to trust that those people and many others—regardless of the result—can be engaged with a democratic socialist platform based on equality, fairness, and freedom for all Canadians. But if the narrative is that these Singh supporters are seen as little more than ‘ethnic interlopers’ into the party, who could blame them if they don’t feel welcome?

  • One NDPer’s position on the leadership contest

    This list and its rationale is my personal opinion and should be taken as such. Nevertheless, it is my hope that this helps participants shore up their list, even if they disagree with my ultimate interpretation. Any of the four hopefuls will make a great leader, and will have three people willing to help them implement their vision for a just Canada.

  • Sixth NDP leadership debate: Debates around CCF-NDP history and means testing generate conflict

    This is a substantive political debate that will continue to play out throughout the rest of the contest, and raises an important question about how we classify and prioritize social spending, income transfers, and all those initiatives to reduce poverty and inequality. In various ways, all four candidates have offered new and transitioned programs to address poverty.

  • NDP leadership race: A labour-themed debate brings most substance yet

    Much is still at stake for 2019, and while Trudeau remains strong, his father in 1972 lost his Trudeaumania majority, nearly lost power altogether, and had to depend on the David Lewis NDP to keep it. Even if 2019 doesn’t bring an NDPer into 24 Sussex, the chosen leader could wield immense power and influence.

  • Fourth NDP leadership debate: New format sparks real debate and discussion

    While Westminster might feel awfully distant from Canada, the CCF-NDP and Canadian labour movement has been deeply influenced by Britain. Much like how the Labour Party provided examples to the CCF-NDP last century, so too can Corbyn provide a basic roadmap towards socialist relevance today. As with the previous recaps, we will look at each candidate individually before offering general closing remarks.

  • Third NDP leadership debate: Two new contestants and a bit more conflict

    Ultimately, the debate was the most passionate one to date, and offered the biggest hints of disagreement and conflict between the six candidates. Nevertheless, the process was a cordial one, with contenders giving credit to one another for the work they had done on various key issues, and still beginning numerous points by agreeing with the previous speaker.

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