Advertisement

Our Times 3

Food and Agriculture

  • Gnawing questions

    Here in Canada, Industry Minister James Moore made it clear last month that he feels no responsibility to feed hungry children. Andrea Levy outlines some of the key challenges and prospects the Left faces with respect to food production, distribution and consumption.

  • A plague of David Attenborough

    In Attenborough’s view, Ethiopians are starving simply because there are too many of them. Since they haven’t voluntarily reduced their numbers, the natural world is doing so, by the “natural” method of mass starvation.

  • The Edible is Political

    The need for a dietary revolution is incontrovertible. But if the moral appeal falls on deaf hearts, the ecological argument should clinch the case.

  • Time for a food revolution

    The solutions to the food crisis are thus deeply intertwined with solutions to the climate crisis and the larger question of global poverty. The steps to get there are not so complex: genuine agrarian reform, local markets, biodiversity, a decentralization of decision-making, all things that social movements have been demanding for decades. There are no technical hurdles standing in the way, only political ones.

  • Fare Questions

    We might have hoped that by the 21st century hunger would be a scourge of the past. But the problem is actually worse now than it was a decade ago.

  • Eco-feminism and farmwomen

    Eco-feminists believe that women and nature share certain traits and are innately attuned. Both women and nature cycle through rhythmic patterns of death and renewal. And women, as caretakers of community life, have a greater awareness of the complex community-level interactions of ecology and nature.

  • The Structural Roots of Hunger, Food Crises and Riots

    In recent months major international banks, financial newspapers and mass media have been forced to recognize that there is a major food crisis and that hundreds of millions of people face hunger, malnutrition and outright starvation. World conferences have been convoked and national emergencies have been declared, as millions riot in nearly fifty countries, threatening to overthrow regimes.

  • Review: Safe Food

    Safe Food is based in on U.S. information and statistics, but much of the manipulation of language that occurs in food-industry lobbying might easily apply to any country.

  • Review: Food Politics

    If ever there was an appropriate title for a book, Food Politics is it. Author Marion Nestle provides extensively researched documentation that food is not simply about sustenance – it is highly political. Who would think that something as innocuous as the Food Pyramid could be so contentious? Nestle purveys her work experience on various nutrition committees into a most revealing look at the disturbing, behind-the-scenes workings and power of the U.S. food industry.

  • Big Soy

    While soy is increasingly promoted as a healthy alternative to animal products in the North, the soy industry is destroying homes, livelihoods, health and the environment across South America. In the context of a global food crisis, in both the North and South large-scale agribusinesses are tightening their grip and local alternatives are espoused as the only saving grace.

Page 2 of 3

Browse the Archive