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Nick Fillmore

  • Corporate-owned media manipulation threatens Canadian democracy

    In today’s media, progressive and small-l liberal ideas that champion the public interest are missing. In our liberal-oriented country, many newspapers do not have even one moderately progressive columnist writing on economic and political issues.

  • Globe and Mail’s RoB shocks by questioning our economic system

    The Globe and Mail–the Canadian media’s strongest supporter of neoliberalism and uncontrolled capitalism–published a news story today that questions whether the economists, business owners and governments that dictate the economic policies of Western society might have it all wrong.

  • Protesters to Occupy Wall Street

    While big marches and sit-ins during the struggle for black rights and an end to the Vietnam War were effective tools for promoting change, such tactics in North America now appear to be losing steam as effective tactics.

  • 9/11 and the “War on Terror”

    From day one, the U.S. government and mainstream media have lied to the public about “why” the attacks occurred and mislead us about “who” was responsible for the attacks.

  • Web Exclusive: No longer a real newspaper: New Globe betrays Canadians

    On the front page, under its masthead, the Globe’s slogan says: “Canada’s national newspaper.” So the public won’t be confused by what they are reading, and so they won’t expect too much from this hybrid, perhaps it should be changed to: “This is not a newspaper.”

  • Funding for Non-profit Media or Public Interest Activities

    Today – with the mainstream media failing to adequately serve the public in many parts of the country, and with multitudes of people fed up with how corporate media manipulate the news – is an opportune time for independent media projects to be established or refocused. The question is, as always: how to get financial backing for the work?

  • Could a ‘mini-paper’ nip at the heels of mainstream press?

    The cost of producing a Globe and Mail or any other traditional paper is quite staggering. Media corporations and other businesses, mainly in the United States, are spending millions of dollars trying to come up with a new business model that will allow them to have both money-making newspapers and Internet-based news operation. For my part, for several weeks now I have been trying to come up with an idea that would make the cost of publishing some sort of newspaper more manageable.

  • Sustainable independent media needs a breakthrough

    Imagine Canada having national and city newspapers and TV news programs and news websites that report fairly on all groups in society, protect the rights of consumers, and cover business in a way that assesses the benefits for all people, not just business owners and investors. The result would be a journalism that contributes to the creation of a more equitable and just society.

  • Globe’s pro-business reporting example of bad journalism

    Staff reporters at the country’s most prominent business news publication, The Globe and Mail’s Report on Business, are at it again – distorting an important issue: the possible sale of Ontario Crown corporations by neglecting to include vital information that could have balanced their reports.

  • Why we must limit the influence of corporate media

    Traditional for-profit media, including our daily newspapers, radio and TV news, filter out all kinds of information they don’t want us to get our hands on.

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