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Our Times 3

Editorial

  • Harper’s Drive to Demolish Dissent

    Contempt of Parliament was the issue that felled the Harper government and it has continued to be a focus of opposition forces in the current election campaign, along with charges of corruption, arrogance and a lack of accountability. Globe and Mail columnist Lawrence Martin says he can name 50 examples of abuse of power. No doubt.

  • Cochabamba +1 live feed

    Live feed from a climate change conference in Montreal. Notable speakers include Maude Barlow, Judy Rebick and Clayton Thomas Muller.

  • Wanted: Bright ideas for dark times

    The far-Right capitalizes on the rage of a declining middle-class by offering “simplistic answers for exceedingly complex problems, and [developing] effective rhetorical strategies to motivate people to vote against their own long-term interests”; it appeals to “people’s sense of betrayal and victimization,” while avoiding “the real social and economic processes that left them vulnerable.”

  • Forestry Agreements

    Climate reality and socio-economic reality are on a backward trajectory worldwide, and most culpable are the settler states formed out of the old British Empire. Indigenous people pay the price of climate change and its false solutions. And the Made-in-Canada “solutions” continue to be environmental and human travesties in every sense.

  • Once more around the Bloc

    Our democratic freedoms hang by a narrow thread, and a police state is always near at hand — that is one of the lessons of the G20 debacle that unfolded in Toronto on June 26 and 27.

  • Pensions in peril

    Across the advanced capitalist world, neoliberal policies have concerted to consign the welfare state to history’s dustbin. As a pillar of the social state, economic security in retirement was an inevitable target.

  • Thinking through the York University strike

    The recent strike by CUPE 3903, which represents the contract faculty, teaching assistants and graduate assistants at York University, has left deep divisions in the union and on campus. In a heated discussion about the merits of the two articles we commissioned, the Dimension collective generated a number of questions over which no agreement emerged. We thought it would be useful to share these questions with our readers.

  • Gaza: Defiant City

    The struggles of the Vietnamese against American imperialism and the liberation struggles in South Africa were historical moments that galvanized people to act in solidarity. The time has come for us to denounce this new form of apartheid and dispel the myths that cloud the path towards justice for Palestine.

  • The Great Recession

    Capitalism is currently enmeshed in its most calamitous economic crisis since the Great Depression. And, just as in that earlier historic conjuncture, while visiting enormous trauma and privation upon working people, this crisis pried open the seams of the system in a way that opened up possibilities – too soon foreclosed – for a different tomorrow. So, the current crisis is a watershed, heralding both pain and the prospect of change.

  • Cuba Si!

    For fifty years progressives, socialists and radicals from around the world have looked to Cuba as the place in which socialism might actually both survive and blossom in its magnificent possibilities. For this reason, Cuba also has to meet higher moral standards. We expect more from its revolutionary leaders because they (especially Fidel) have promised more. And they have delivered remarkably in health, education, social welfare and the blossoming of the arts and sciences.

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