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Christo Aivalis

  • Water isn’t a human right in Canada, but it should be

    There has been a brewing controversy over the use, ownership, and commodification of important natural resources like fresh and clean drinking water. And rightfully so, because while Canada has high amounts of fresh water in global terms, the reality of water insecurity is apparent even here, especially as it pertains to Indigenous communities.

  • The blind alleys of “Generation Screwed”

    Much has been made about the experience of millennials in the contemporary economy. And this isn’t without reason: wages are low, education is expensive, housing is inaccessible and finding secure employment is increasingly difficult. There does need to be a discussion in our society about intergenerational inequality, including within labour unions and left movements.

  • Socialism for today’s NDP, and today’s Canada

    While not a topic without coverage, the question of socialism within the New Democratic Party — and Canada more generally — tends to come in waves. One recent example has come from Toronto Star columnist Rick Salutin’s assertion that the NDP must re-embrace socialism, if only to offer strategic differentiation vis-à-vis the Trudeau Liberals.

  • Postal banking and the future of Canadian public services

    But with Postal Banking, the process can be reversed. Canadians don’t need to rely on capitalists to provide social necessities; Canadians don’t need to accept the erosion of economic democracy; and Canadians don’t need to accept a system of economic organization that provides basic services only when they are profitable.

  • Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and lesser-evilism: The liberals who cried wolf?

    The American people don’t deserve Trump, the world doesn’t deserve Trump, and even the average Democratic voter doesn’t deserve Trump. But liberal elites across the developed world do. It was their cuts to social programs, their imbalanced trade deals, and their attacks on the organized working class that set into motion such a potential catastrophe.

  • The looming Canada Post lockout: Workers resist concessions for next generation

    Inter-union solidarity is always important, but the battles being fought in these negotiations will have an effect in every community and household over the short and long term. This is about more than a percent here or a percent there on a paycheque — this is about the survival of decent employment, and the prospects of what this movement means to young workers.

  • The Leap Manifesto and the NDP

    It’s possible that backing the Leap Manifesto would bode poorly for Mulcair’s centrist vision, but it might also be the case—should he read the writing on the wall—that he supports this new initiative as a way forward for him, and the party. We shall soon find out.

  • What Bernie Sanders can teach the Canadian left

    While democratic socialism may well take a different form in Canada than with Sanders, the latter has shown us that the public, even in a conservative nation like the United States, is clamoring for social and economic equality and democracy. Americans are listening to Bernie Sanders; Canadians are listening to Bernie Sanders; NDP parliamentarians like Niki and Steve Ashton are listening to Bernie Sanders; the question remains: is the NDP as a whole listening?

  • Today’s NDP, Socialism, and the Party’s Legacy

    What the NDP needs is a combination of its existing social progressivism with a recommitment to the principles of economic democracy and a healthy skepticism of capitalism. This, and not electoral opportunism, is the enduring legacy of the democratic socialist tradition in Canada.

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