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The Coming Cold War with China

The deterioration in relations between China and the United States is gathering steam, creating new uncertainties and dangers. Will Joe Biden ratchet up tensions with the world’s emerging economic superpower? How will Canada respond? In this collection, we analyze why increased rivalry with China is beginning to resemble a new Cold War.

  • Biden is playing an apocalyptic game of chicken with China

    Chinese and American leaders are now playing a game of chicken that couldn’t be more dangerous for both countries and the planet. Isn’t it time for the new Biden administration and its Chinese opposite to grasp more clearly and deeply that their hostile behaviors and decisions could have unforeseeable and catastrophic consequences?

  • China, the Canadian left, and countering state capitalist apologia

    We must learn to resist China’s dispossession and discrimination against Uighurs and other ethnic minorities as part and parcel of a global movement against racial subjugation, colonialism, police brutality, surveillance, and incarceration. Only then will we be able to realize that working-class interests transcend borders, regardless of what the elites in our respective countries keep telling us.

  • It’s time for Canada to restore relations with China

    The arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou was a colossal blunder by the Trudeau government, executed at the request of the now almost universally discredited Trump administration, which blatantly admitted that she was being held hostage as a bargaining chip in the former president’s trade war with China. Canada should release Meng and chart a new course for relations with China—before it’s too late.

  • How China is building a non-imperialist model of international development

    China presents its Belt and Road Initiative as a way to address global deficits of development, peace and governance and has called for an international community with a shared future, while some of its critics see these initiatives as a challenge to a Western-dominated liberal world order and an attempt at securing hegemony. But the Chinese model suggests a new, anti-imperialist model of international governance may well be taking shape.

  • Why is the Guardian promoting more Pentagon propaganda?

    Recent reporting by the Guardian reinforces the false (and dangerous) impression that the United States is threatened by Chinese and Russian expansionism and that the Pentagon is justified in adopting an even more aggressive posture toward Chinese naval forces in the South China Sea. With liberal ‘journalism’ such as this, who needs US government propaganda?

  • Why the Trump administration’s extradition request against Meng Wanzhou is a farce

    The case of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou has generated a mountain of press coverage, but precious little of it—including John Ivison’s National Post op-ed—exhibits a meaningful understanding of Canada’s unjust extradition regime. What’s more, there are strong grounds to believe that the United States government’s allegations against Meng are political in nature, and meant to disguise ulterior geopolitical motives.

  • US fearmongering on China not rooted in facts, but racism

    Racist fears about China have existed for more than a century in the United States. ‘Yellow Peril’ emerged as a mechanism to control and exploit migrant Chinese workers fleeing from the devastation that the West’s Opium Wars imposed on China. Today, this racism has manifested in tandem with contemporary forms of anti-communism to demonize China in mainstream politics and media.

  • Backlash over ‘Free Meng Wanzhou’ event reflects growing anti-China sentiment

    Calling to “Free Meng Wanzhou” is not an endorsement of the Chinese government’s unacceptable detention of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, nor its policies in Hong Kong or Xinjiang. Rather, it represents a much-needed effort to fundamentally reassess Canadian foreign policy and push back against the new Cold War on China.

  • Vote No. 23 is the first shot in Erin O’Toole’s war on China

    Vote No. 23 specifically targets China as a threat to Canadian “values” and demands the government table a plan to “combat China’s growing foreign operations.” In the midst of the pandemic, this motion (and the agenda behind it) have not penetrated most people’s bubbles. We ignore it at our peril. Vote No. 23 represents the thin edge of a wedge that would cleave the world in two and potentially lead to unmitigated disaster.

  • Canada should release Meng Wanzhou—and pursue an independent foreign policy

    The current hearings on the extradition of Meng Wanzhou are a tangled web of legal arguments that obscure a simple truth: the Canadian government is enabling a witch hunt on the part of the Trump administration against a Chinese capitalist rival—the telecommunications giant, Huawei. This is putting Canada in the crosshairs of the US and China, aligning us closer than ever to wayward American foreign policy, and jeopardizing the safety and security of all.

  • Canadian media’s double standard on ‘foreign influence’ has become painfully clear

    Lately, the Globe and Mail, Canada’s ‘paper of record,’ has been so gripped with anti-Chinese fervour that it has become blind to a blatant double standard. Contrasting the newspaper’s reporting on Chinese influence in Canada with its coverage of the Israel lobby highlights the increasingly Sinophobic nature of its journalism and commentary.

  • How China is working to expand its ties to Latin America

    China is prepared to increase its interaction with other countries, both through investments into those countries or by welcoming investment into China. To accomplish this, China has developed three distinct pillars toward Latin America: purchases of Latin American goods, Chinese investment in Latin America, and Chinese political solidarity with key Latin American governments.

  • Why America’s economic war on China is failing

    Both the Republican Party and the Democratic Party are committed to a policy that will not cause China to surrender to the ambitions of the United States. Whether or not the US can backtrack from this policy orientation and begin a dialogue with China remains to be seen; doing so would be, of course, desirable.

  • The fate of capitalism hangs in the balance of international power

    Most commentary on international relations proceeds as if the global order floated above the patchwork quilt of the world map, an ethereal stage on which disembodied states play leading or bit parts in consequential but ultimately inexplicable plots. Inadequate at the best of times, such commentary will not serve when the fate of capitalism itself hangs in the balance of international power.

  • Why a reset of Canada-China relations is more urgent than ever

    Is the surest path to victory in the Green Party leadership race, as Georgia Straight editor Charlie Smith suggests, to “explicitly support Hong Kong’s right to self-determination and declare unwavering support for the independence of Taiwan”? The world doesn’t need a second Cold War. Calling for an end to Canada’s One China policy pushes us further down that path.

  • The difference between the US and China’s response to COVID-19 is staggering

    The United States continues to have the largest total number of cases of COVID-19. The government continues to flounder as the number of cases escalates. Not one state in the country seems immune to the spread of the disease. Meanwhile, in China, ever since the virus was crushed in Wuhan, the government merely has had to contain small-scale localized outbreaks

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