Articles Tagged ‘Social Movements’

  • Media are complicit in the sexual exploitation of women

    Culture

    Toronto Sun contributor Sabrina Maddeaux wrote recently that Canada will not truly be part of the #metoo/timesup movement until (really) big names begin to fall. But a higher, louder circus of blame will achieve little. When corporate media surrenders its massive and profitable investment in the sexuality of women, when Victoria’s Secret disappears and the Sunshine Girls put their clothes on, then we can begin the journey to safety for women.

  • The movement for Black lives stands with the Palestinian people

    Middle East

    We know that the United States government sends the same weapons to Tel Aviv as it sends to Ferguson, and hundreds of other cities across the country. We know that police officers in the United States learn the tactics of war from Israeli police forces, who come annually to train U.S. officers in methods of oppression, surveillance and murder. We understand that we are connected to the Palestinian people by our shared demand for recognition and justice.

  • Rebuild Public Hospitals and Long-Term Care

    Canadian Politics

    After touring Ontario in recent weeks, Ontario Health Coalition spokeswoman Natalie Mehra returned to Toronto on 16 May 2018 at a press conference outside the Emergency Department at Mount Sinai Hospital to talk about the crisis in access to healthcare. Noting that the Coalition’s mandate is to protect public healthcare in the public interest, she said that the group has chosen its words carefully and has not used the word “crisis” since the 1990s.

  • Trees and teargas: worldviews clash at Barriere Lake

    Events from a chilling October day in 2008, on a gravel road entering Algonquin First Nation bush territory, epitomize the contentious history of jurisdiction in what is now known as Canada. Riot cops teargassed the community standing at a blockade and arrested nine people, including two minors, an elder, and a pregnant woman. The alarming story of Barriere Lake reveals much about the tactics and devices used by the state to continue its dispossession of Indigenous peoples’ land.

  • True test of reconciliation: respect the Indigenous right to say No

    Indigenous Politics

    The right to say no is the core of any future relationship with the Canadian state and its citizens. It’s a basic right — one which is grounded in our sovereignty as individuals and Nations to decide for ourselves the life we wish to live. Canada has made it clear we have no right to say no, only an obligation to say yes. First Nations leaders and citizens should not wait to see how this plays out in court – they should assert and defend their right to say no now.

  • Western Leaders Betrayed Palestinians 70 Years Ago. There is no sign that’s about to change

    Middle East

    On Tuesday, Palestinians will commemorate the anniversary of the Nakba, or catastrophe, their mass expulsion and dispossession 70 years ago as the new state of Israel was built on the ruins of their homeland. As a result, most Palestinians were turned into refugees, denied by Israel the right to return to their homes. Israel is braced for many tens of thousands to turn out in the occupied territories this week to protest against decades of its refusal to end its oppressive rule.

  • NDP falls far short of needed leap to the left

    Canadian Politics

    Canadians hoping to see bold ideas and a more radical orientation emerge from the federal New Democrats’ February convention in Ottawa are surely feeling disappointed. Four months after Jagmeet Singh’s fi rst ballot victory, a party still struggling to regain its balance following electoral demolition in 2015 again failed to capitalize on a historic opportunity to distance itself from and challenge the Liberals with a transformative left-wing vision.

  • Climate change and the next left

    Environment

    Climate change is already happening. But the really bad news is that there’s very strong evidence that capitalism will deliver a future of catastrophic climate change that will have far-reaching effects around the world, especially in the imperialized countries of the Global South. There is a vast gap between the continuing growth of greenhouse gas emissions and the massive reductions of emissions are needed to prevent widespread catastrophes.

  • Where Are the Riots of Yesteryear? Remembering May 1968

    Putting aside polemics, the great strength of Abidor’s May Made Me, is that it presents a variety of voices among participants, leaving the reader to ponder their testimony and make up her own mind. Fifty years later, he has gathered the eye-opening oral testimonies of those then-young rebels. By listening to the voices of students and workers, as well as to those of their leaders, his book makes May ’68 appear as an event driven by millions of individuals.

  • Free and Accessible Transit Now

    Social Movements

    More is at stake than reducing traffic congestion and gridlock. Transit and general mobility are intimately related to larger issues in capitalist society: how goods and services are produced and delivered; the location of and nature of jobs; where and how we live and travel; issues of class, inequality and oppression related to race, age, gender, and sexuality; climate justice; and the very shape and nature of our democratic institutions.

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