Articles Tagged ‘Social Movements’

  • A Critical Week for the World Social Forum

    Social Movements

    In 2002, a seismic shift occurred with the election of a working-class president from northeast Brazil, the poorest part of the country. At the same time, a strong wave of mobilization was sweeping Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, as well as Bolivia, where an unprecedented indigenous movement had taken centre stage.

  • Militant Hope in the Age of Trump

    USA Politics

    The United States stands at the endpoint of a long series of attacks on democracy, and the choices faced by the American public today point to the divide between those who are committed to democracy and those who are not. Debates over whether Donald Trump was a fascist or Hillary Clinton was a right-wing warmonger and tool of Wall Street were a tactical diversion.

  • The Power of Deep Organizing

    Social Movements

    Raising Expectations was full of struggles that McAlevey was directly involved in – struggles that showed what could be done despite the overwhelming power of capital. It had a personal, chatty feel to it and had an instant and powerful impact on rank-and-file workers and labour activists, quickly and deservedly making McAlevey a hit on the labour circuit as a speaker, trainer, and strategist.

  • Transnationalism and Italian anarchists in Canada, 1915-1940

    Travis Tomchuck’s Transnational Radicals focuses on the movement of Italian anarchists from Italy to Canada and the U.S. and back to Italy to show the long-term contours of the Italian anarchist movement and its activities across borders, thus the term “transnational.” Transnationalism is the process by which migrants create and sustain social relations that link their societies of origin and societies of settlement.

  • Looking forward: five predictions for the Canadian Left in 2017

    Canadian Politics

    2016 was a disappointing year for the Left, as we saw the Democratic Party’s attack on Bernie Sanders, the election of Donald Trump, right-wing motivations for Brexit in the United Kingdom, and the intensification of anti-immigrant rhetoric at home and abroad. But with a new year comes new hopes, opportunities and challenges. Here are five predictions for how the Canadian Left can find success going forward.

  • Basic Income: Progressive Dreams Meet Neoliberal Realities

    Economic Crisis

    The model of BI that governments are working on in their social policy laboratories will not ‘end the tyranny of the labour market’ but render it more dreadful. The agenda of austerity and privatization requires a system of income support that renders people as powerless and desperate as possible in the face of exploitation and that won’t change if it is relabelled as ‘Basic Income’.

  • Debating Syria Productively

    Middle East

    Those of us in countries like Canada, UK and the U.S. need to strongly oppose the brutal war in Yemen and the siege of civilians in Mosul and any and all intervention in Syria. We need to understand that solidarity with the people of Syria, Iraq and the entire region begins with us actually stopping the reflexive reaction to intervene in countries we don’t live in.

  • Mapping the vocabulary of the radical Left

    This wide spectrum of essays offers richly grounded and concrete tools for navigating anticapitalist struggle. For example, John Bellamy Foster’s and Patrick Bond’s respective chapters on nature and sustainability provide conceptual and historical clarity for any political project that considers environmental destruction and the limits of natural resources, time, labour and money.

  • Palestine and the Dakota Access Pipeline: Time to globalize BDS

    Indigenous Politics

    As Canadian Dimension readers know, the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign is a Palestinian movement of resistance to Israeli settler-colonialist expansion and corporate complicity with it — a successful strategy learned from the struggle against the South African Apartheid regime whose aims it echoes.

  • Unity, Struggle, and Victory: The Second Assembly of ALBA Social Movements

    Latin America and the Caribbean

    In the 1970s and 1980s, when Latin America became the testing lab for neoliberal policies, this brought a major reconfiguration to the social and political landscape. Organized labour was dealt a double blow, suffering systemic violence but also weakened by structural reforms. Against this background it was popular movements that took to the front lines of struggle.

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