Articles Tagged ‘Poverty’

  • Seattle wants to tax the rich so the poor can afford to live there

    USA Politics

    Seattle has the fourth-highest tax burden for families earning $25,000 among 51 other urban centres, according to a report done by the chief financial officer for the District of Columbia. It is ranked fifth in the United States for its number of millennials earning more than $350,000 a year and is home to six Fortune 500 companies.

  • Housing in the age of austerity: Toronto’s war on the poor

    Canadian Politics

    It wasn’t always this bad for Toronto’s non-rich residents. In 1970, 66 per cent of Toronto neighbourhoods were middle-income. This was when the labour market allowed for single-income families, when social services were better available to the poor and when affordable housing was constructed according to need.

  • Implementing Austerity By Downloading Responsibility

    Canadian Politics

    The reality of austerity is often talked about in terms of the millions of dollars cut from social spending. Too infrequently do we actually talk about the impact on real people who bear the brunt of these cuts. Laura and her two kids are three of the thousands of people who daily face the consequences of the Liberal government’s decision to gut social assistance.

  • Brexit: A Workers’ Response to Oligarchs, Bankers, Flunkies, and Scabs

    Europe

    http://dissidentvoice.org/2016/07/brexit-a-workers-response-to-oligarchs-bankers-flunkies-and-scabs/

  • When it Comes to Poverty Reduction, Budget 2016 Earns Failing Grade

    Canadian Politics

    Not simply an example of the moral callousness of the Wynne government, Budget 2016 is a reflection of the current weakness of our movement. If the provincial Liberals are to earn better grades, we will need to encourage them—with protests, rallies, organizing, activism, and effective advocacy—to go back to school.

  • A Message From the Dispossessed

    Culture

    The terrorist attack in France that took place at the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo was not about free speech. It was not about radical Islam. It did not illustrate the fictitious clash of civilizations.

  • How Martin Luther King’s legacy speaks to our Canadian reality

    From the Arab Spring to the global movement to end violence against women and girls, from anti-austerity protests in Europe to Occupy Wall Street, from rebellions of urban youth in France and the U.K. to indigenous struggles in the Americas, once again people are on the move the world over. We are waiting for new systems of justice and equality to be born.

  • Homeless Hotspot

    There has been substantial debate, and much virtual ink spilt, over the Homeless Hotspot program in Austin, Texas. The program is relatively straightforward from the title: 13 homeless men and one woman with mobile wireless internet hotspots in their pockets hawking internet access on street corners. Launched at SXSW, the premier gathering of hip indie rockers, it has been read by many as the corporate horror-tech future to come, where poor people are little more than machines designed to serve as human infrastructure to extend the privilege of the few.

  • Race, Civility, and a Good Cup of Tea

    Web Exclusive

    Despite decries of violence as “mindless vigilantism,” and self-aggrandizing volunteer clean-up squads, the London riots convey important ideas about race, civility, and the concept of the “political” in western liberal democracy.

  • Nameless and homeless: Affordable housing—if not now, when?

    Today, it’s widely acknowledged that the “deinstitutionalization” of psychiatric survivors has been a total failure and fraud; it was from the very start. Why? Because of government incompetence and negligence, poor urban planning, and public indifference to “discharged” psychiatric survivors and other poor, marginalized and stigmatized people in our communities.

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