Articles Tagged ‘Mining’

  • The “Ugly Canadian” is on the March: Trudeau is its New Face

    Canadian Politics

    Two years into their mandate the Trudeau regime has yet to follow through on their repeated promises to rein in Canada’s controversial international mining sector. Despite this commitment, they have adopted no measures to restrict public support for Canadian mining companies responsible for significant abuses abroad.

  • Canada’s ongoing complicity with exploitive extraction schemes

    Canadian Business

    One hundred and seventy-six years on, the Canadian state today remains more committed to — and dependent upon — the mining business than any other government in the world. Three-quarters of the world’s mining companies today are headquartered in Canada. The bulk of this investment comes from outside of Canada, while the majority of the production it finances also occurs abroad.

  • Three years on, Mount Polley disaster a painful reminder of never-ending horror

    Environment

    Canada’s largest mine waste disaster on August 4, 2014, saw 24 million cubic metres of mine waste and water flushed into Hazeltine and Edney Creeks and Polley and Quesnel Lakes, all part of the Fraser River Watershed. The littoral area along the West Arm of Quesnel Lake was permanently altered by the Mount Polley spill, and there is no plan to stop polluting anytime soon.

  • World’s biggest coal company closes 37 mines as solar power’s influence grows

    Environment

    The largest coal mining company in the world has announced it will close 37 mines because they are no longer economically viable. Coal India, which produces around 82 per cent of India’s coal, said the mines would be decommissioned by March 2018. The closures, of around 9 per cent of the state-run firm’s sites, will reportedly save around 8,000,000,000 rupees (£98m).

  • Where One Canadian Mining Company Goes, Violence Follows

    Canadian Business

    Canadians have heard almost nothing from the dominant media about Banro’s violent quest for billions of dollars in minerals. The little that has been reported is mostly the company justifying its operations. But where are the voices of ordinary Congolese? Don’t they deserve to be heard? Canadians need to know what this country’s mining companies are doing around the world.

  • Why Aren’t Corporations Required to be Socially Responsible?

    Globalization

    Imagine if a corporation had to justify its existence beyond making money for capitalists. What would happen if a social balance sheet, as well as financial one, had to be filed every year and companies continually in a deficit position would eventually disappear? Consider Barrick Gold. Would the world be better off if the world’s largest gold miner ceased to exist?

  • Toronto’s Buried History: The Dark Story of How Mining Built a City

    Canadian Business

    Toronto is a city built on mining. Nearly 75% of mining companies globally are headquartered in Canada and almost 60% are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX). In 2015, more than half of all capital investment in the mining business travelled through the exchange. In fact, few, if any, other capital markets around the world are as specialised in a single industry as Toronto is in mining.

  • Profits, Coercion, and Resistance in Latin America

    Canadian Business

    What forms have Canadian capitalist expansion and Canadian state interference in Latin America assumed in recent decades? How have Latin American workers, peasants, and indigenous communities – dispossessed and exploited by Canadian capital – responded in turn? What precisely are the contours of this dialectic of accumulation by dispossession and popular resistance?

  • Toxic Tsunami

    Canadian Business

    With governments acting as complicit handmaidens of private mining companies, it is only social movements and public institutional voices from churches and universities that stand for an end to corporate impunity. We need to up our game in defending not only the workers and communities affected by mining, but also the very land and watersheds and ecological systems that extractivism destroys.

  • Orgreave: Winning the battle means winning the war

    Labour

    The truth about the Battle of Orgreave paints an incriminating picture of the neoliberal capitalist state, the police and mainstream media. For this reason, the government will attempt to block any inquiry. They know that if the truth is acknowledged, the structural foundations and imagery of neoliberal society will begin to crumble.

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