Articles Tagged ‘International’

  • Understanding Russia, Un-Demonizing Putin

    Europe

    The Russian president is clearly a long-term thinker and planner and has proven to be an excellent analyst and strategist. He is a leader who can quietly work toward his goals under mounds of accusations and myths that have been steadily leveled at him since he became the Russian Federation’s second president. I’ve stood by silently watching the demonization of Putin grow since it began in the early 2000s –– I pondered my thoughts and concerns, and included them in a book published in 2011.

  • America’s Imperial Decline Might Be Our Last, Best Hope to Salvage Our Democracy

    USA Politics

    When the United States vetoed a United Nations Security Council resolution asking nations not to build any more diplomatic missions in Jerusalem only to be drubbed 128-9 in the General Assembly, which voted on a similar non-binding resolution last week, America’s ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, loudly proclaimed that the United States would be “taking names.” Her warning fell on deaf ears.

  • Open Letter to Jagmeet Singh: NDP’s reactionary foreign policy positions must be changed

    Canadian Politics

    It is absolutely certain that those Canadians who have taken the trouble to discover the truth about Canada’s minister of foreign affairs are dismayed and perplexed. But where is the NDP on this matter? From what I know, there hasn’t been a word from them on this issue. Mr. Singh, could you possibly do something about this? In this letter I have presented several matters that require the NDP’s attention.

  • A Tar Sands Partnership Agreement in the Making?

    The Tar Sands lobby, environmental astro-turfing and the global implications of Canada’s Tar Sand initiative.

  • Today, can we believe in change?

    Eleven years ago today five young Cubans, Gerardo Hernández, Ramon Labañino, Antonio Guerrero, René Gonzalez and Fernando González, were arrested after infiltrating extreme right-wing Cuban American groups based in southern Florida in an attempt to prevent further terrorist attacks against the Cuban people. Tried in 2001 during a judicial process in Miami in the biased and threatening anti Cuban environment, they were condemned to harsh and disproportionate sentences.

  • WALRUS BULLS BELLOWING ON A BEACH

    I am disappointed with the view of some knowledgeable commentators over Scotland’s release of the dying man who was convicted of the Lockerbie-airline bombing.

    From a purely power-politics point of view, of course, they are right: judging by the ugly noises echoing across the oceans from America, Scotland has done itself no favor.

  • Canada stoops before Honduran Coup

    Canadian Politics

    Canada’s minister for the Americas is reported to have said things at the OAS special meeting of July 4 that, whatever its participants understood, do mislead Canadian quick readers of newspapers. Readers are left with a strong impression not just that Canada supports the military’s ouster of the Honduran president, but that Canada should support the putsch, as should everyone.

  • War By Other Means

    Concerning non-Western elections, it is clear there is but one rule: if the results support pro-US candidates they are deemed ‘democratic’, otherwise they are automatically demonized as ‘fradulent’. The Iranian elections are no different, and the West’s support of Iranian protest and calls of election fraud do not have anything at all to do with the spirit of democracy.

  • Peru:  Blood Flows in the Amazon

    In early June, Peruvian President Alan García, an ally of US President Barack Obama, ordered armored personnel carriers, helicopter gun-ships and hundreds of heavily armed troops to assault and disperse a peaceful, legal protest organized by members of Peru’s Amazonian indigenous communities protesting the entry of foreign multinational mining companies on their traditional homelands. Dozens of Indians were killed or are missing, scores have been injured and arrested and a number of Peruvian police, held hostage by the indigenous protestors were killed in the assault. President García declared martial law in the region in order to enforce his unilateral and unconstitutional fiat granting of mining exploitation rights to foreign companies, which infringed on the integrity of traditional Amazonian indigenous communal lands.

     

  • Keynes and ‘National Self-Sufficiency’

    today’s world it may seem that I am trying to link Keynes with the autarky of, say, North Korea, but of course I am quoting the title of an article he wrote in 1933, in that prior period of great economic crisis of the 1930s, in which he argued the case for national self-sufficiency or, more precisely, for less international finance and less international trade. “I would sympathize… with those who would minimize rather than those who would maximize, economic entanglement among nations [a marvelous phrase]. Ideas, knowledge, science, hospitality, travel – these are the things which should of their nature be international. But let goods be homespun whenever it is reasonably and conveniently possible, and, above all, let finance be primarily local.”

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