Articles Tagged ‘Indigenous Politics’

  • Unravelling the secrets of the National Inquiry

    Canadian Politics

    The inquiry’s secretive process has resulted in a loss in faith by many would-be participants. Several commentators have said that being trauma-informed should not be an excuse for not getting started. Some family members feel that all this secrecy is re-traumatizing them. Even the former Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Murray Sinclair, told the Inquiry to just start already.

  • Criminal law ejects Indigenous peoples from the frontiers

    The book breaks from the constant examination of Indigenous peoples and instead rests its gaze on settler society and the system that upholds their material privileges. The focus on the justice system and its use of criminalization in the private property protection of the settlers reveals something important about the dominant economic systems operating in these two countries: there is, in fact, no “Indian Problem,” but rather a very real settler problem.

  • One girl’s trauma exposes plight of nations

    I received Indigenous author Katherena Vermette’s debut novel, The Break, as a gift over the holiday season. Having heard nothing of it, little did I know, upon turning its opening pages, that I would be carried from the comforts of my Winnipeg south-end suburban home into the north-end community where I had spent the previous two years working as a school counsellor to some of our Prairie city’s most vulnerable youth.

  • Evidence of good faith lacking in Trudeau’s Indigenous agenda

    Canadian Politics

    We gave Trudeau’s government more than a year to put some good faith on the table. Instead, we see a lot of talk but very little substantive action on the matters that matter most to us. If our right to free, informed and prior consent before development on our lands is not respected, that is the equivalent of breaching our Aboriginal, treaty and title rights. How does that make him any different from Harper?

  • Essays on Indigenous struggles offer both insight and oversight

    Indigenous occupations are thus not simply a breach of Canadian legal orders but also a reassertion of Indigenous law. Unfortunately, too often the focus of Blockades or Breakthroughs on intricate conflicts within Indigenous communities obscures the larger contest with colonialism that underlies Indigenous peoples’ adoption of direct action.

  • Our Land: 150 Years of Colonialism

    Culture

    The collaborative project will be an ongoing poster series that aims to intervene in the Canada 150 conversation. We hope to encourage people to critically examine history in ways that can fuel our radical imaginations and support struggles for radical change in 2017 and beyond. Join us as we use activist art to remember, resist, and redraw our world with an eye to changing it for the better.

  • Palestine and the Dakota Access Pipeline: Time to globalize BDS

    Indigenous Politics

    As Canadian Dimension readers know, the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign is a Palestinian movement of resistance to Israeli settler-colonialist expansion and corporate complicity with it — a successful strategy learned from the struggle against the South African Apartheid regime whose aims it echoes.

  • Trudeau’s promises unravel in legal battle over Indigenous rights

    Canadian Politics

    Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party campaigned on the promise of a “renewed, nation-to-nation relationship” between the government and Indigenous communities. Trudeau promised the Assembly of First Nations that he would govern “not only in accordance with constitutional obligations, but also with those enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”

  • Standing Rock Stakes Claim for Sovereignty

    Environment

    Mainstream media would have most of us believe that the current struggle at Standing Rock, North Dakota is all about clean water – that its only focus is stopping the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) from running through Indigenous reservation land. And, yes, it is about these things. But while such a narrative may create “hot headlines,” it fails to capture the full truth and essence of what‘s really going on there.

  • Decolonizing Cottage Country: Anishinaabe Art Intervenes in Canada’s Wild Rice War

    Canadian Politics

    It is a heavy responsibility that must be more equally shouldered by Canadians and Quebecers. Labour and activist groups from coast to coast should rally to support Indigenous land defenders. Because we share the Earth, we must also share in the struggles to defend it against the depredations of colonialism and capitalism.

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