Articles Tagged ‘Idlenomore’

  • Debriefing Elsipogtog: the Anatomy of a Struggle

    Miles Howe broke the story about fracking and showed how far the New Brunswick government, the U.S. company SWN Resources and the police were willing to go to open the province to fracking. Howe also demonstrated the commitment of Aboriginal people, and some white settler communities in the poorest province in Canada, to fight the destruction of their land and water.

  • Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied

    Highway of Tears also calls on Canadians to demand a national inquiry and argues that Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples need to forge social movement alliances to effectively combat the root causes of the issue: poverty, racism, and gender discrimination. But time is of the essence. Justice delayed is justice denied.

  • Colonial past, colonial present

    Canadian Politics

    “The more Things change, the more they stay the same.” The aphorism may be overused, but it aptly captures the current state of relations between Stephen Harper and Indigenous peoples: our current government is perpetuating the legacy of its predecessors while moving into decidedly dangerous territory.

  • From Ontario to Oaxaca: How to kick a mining company out of your community

    Canadian Politics

    While geographically distant, these two communities have come through their respective struggles having learned some similar lessons about the mining industry, the governments that support it, and the steps that can be taken to reclaim power and defend their homes.

  • What was Former Prime Minister Paul Martin Thinking?

    Through the theft of land and resources Canada has been very successful at manufacturing a national mindset in the people not Indigenous to Turtle Island. By manufacturing this mindset of “Canada the good and benevolent nation” many Canadians have an inability to understand what really happened to Indigenous people.

  • Brazeau, Harper and Idle No More

    The Brazeau affair — sad, repugnant and bizarre all at the same time — shines a light on two aspects of Canadian politics that desperately need some exposure.

  • Dispossessing democracy

    As Parliament resumes, Stephen Harper has made it clear that he remains committed to implementing Bill C-45 in the face of widespread social protest. But thanks, in part, to Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence’s hunger strike, Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples are now working together, through the Idle No More movement, to grow a strong oppositional alliance against the Harper government, and Bill C-45 has become something of a lightning rod for criticism.

  • The High Stakes of Native Resistance

    The blossoming of the Idle No More movement signals the return of native resistance to the political and social landscape of Canada and Quebec.

  • Harper & Co.‘s failing math

    The Conservatives were ever-so-prepared to ram their clever omnibus wrecking balls down our collective throats. Indigenous peoples are standing up and saying no. They’re calling on non-Indigenous people to do the same.

  • Idle No More Visits The Sun

    You have to give Ezra Levant full marks for chutzpah. A week or so ago he met a hundred Idle No More protestors at the door of the Toronto Sun.

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