Articles Tagged ‘Energy’

  • World’s biggest coal company closes 37 mines as solar power’s influence grows

    Environment

    The largest coal mining company in the world has announced it will close 37 mines because they are no longer economically viable. Coal India, which produces around 82 per cent of India’s coal, said the mines would be decommissioned by March 2018. The closures, of around 9 per cent of the state-run firm’s sites, will reportedly save around 8,000,000,000 rupees (£98m).

  • All fossil-fuel vehicles will vanish in 8 years in twin ‘death spiral’ for big oil and autos

    Environment

    No more petrol or diesel cars, buses, or trucks will be sold anywhere in the world within eight years. The entire market for land transport will switch to electrification, leading to a collapse of oil prices and the demise of the petroleum industry as we have known it for a century. This is the futuristic forecast by Stanford University economist Tony Seba. His report, with the deceptively bland title Rethinking Transportation 2020-2030.

  • Beyond Petroculture: strategies for a Left energy transition

    Canadian Politics

    Energy can be a politics by other means. It is a way of enacting and enabling Left principles of social equality and environmental responsibility in relation to a new set of discourses and co-ordinates. Real energy transition opens the way for social and political transition, and does so on the basis of equality of social capacity and a commitment to protecting the planet.

  • A blueprint for Canada’s energy policy

    When Ralph Nader called Gordon Laxer’s book After the Sands “a myth-destroying blockbuster” it couldn’t have been better put. This is a long-overdue insightful analysis of not only Canada’s oil and gas industry, but also the economic and political framework within which it operates.

  • Manitoba Hydro’s privatization of Nigeria’s power grid would be illegal in home province

    Africa

    Largely unbeknownst to its owners, Manitoba Hydro International has stirred significant controversy in Africa’s most populous nation. Over the past four years the Nigerian press has published hundreds of articles about MHI’s diplomatic backing, conflicts with local officials and disputes over its four-year contract to manage the Transmission Company of Nigeria.

  • Seven Ways Climate Change Is Getting Personal in Ontario

    Environment

    Climate change is hitting home across Ontario, whether you love hiking, skating, swimming, or sipping a craft wine from the Niagara region’s vineyards. It’s affecting jobs, too, including in tourism, shipping and energy sectors. Here are seven ways climate change is getting personal in the province.

  • From FAILURE20 to COP21

    Environment

    Time is ripe for a massive mobilization of social forces from below to put pressure on our political leaders. Trade unions will have to play a decisive role in such a mobilization. It is a question of what kind of society we want to develop. It is a question of having a just transition to a society based on clean and renewable energy.

  • Nunavut is still a colony

    Indigenous Politics

    An examination of contemporary struggles over mineral extraction suggests that Nunavut is still being governed as a resource colony.

  • U.S. Corporations Launch Wave of NAFTA Attacks on Canada’s Energy, Fracking, and Medicines Policies

    U.S. corporations have launched an alarming new offensive against Canadian health and environmental policies under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Three U.S. firms recently announced plans to use the “trade” pact to seek nearly one billion taxpayer dollars in private, NAFTA-created tribunals as compensation for Canadian policies on fracking, wind energy, and medicine patents.

  • Does Anyone in Government Really Care About Canadian Jobs?

    The Canadian government has promoted the pipeline as creating thousands of jobs. But this is only during the construction phase. Enbridge’s own submission to the Joint Review Panel on the Northern Gateway pipeline suggests that the operations phase would create perhaps as few as 104 permanent jobs, and only 26 directly in Alberta. Give or take some other jobs involving regular maintenance and, sadly enough, dealing with environmental damages, Canada’s net benefit in shipping its raw bitumen seems negligible.

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