Articles Tagged ‘Economy’

  • Basic Income and the left: The political and economic problems

    Economic Crisis

    The discussion over BI touches on real political and economic anxieties. The attack on the social welfare state, the depreciating power of organized labour and an economy producing increasingly low-wage precarious jobs have led many to search for alternative mechanisms and policies to address these problems. It is no wonder that BI with its promise of streamlined access to minimal economic security has attracted many adherents on the Left.

  • Housing in the age of austerity: Toronto’s war on the poor

    Canadian Politics

    It wasn’t always this bad for Toronto’s non-rich residents. In 1970, 66 per cent of Toronto neighbourhoods were middle-income. This was when the labour market allowed for single-income families, when social services were better available to the poor and when affordable housing was constructed according to need.

  • Why the system will still win

    Economic Crisis

    That means facing the probability the EU is now so path-dependent as a neoliberal construction that reform of it is no longer seriously conceivable. It would have to be undone before anything better could be built, either by breaking out of the current EU, or by reconstructing Europe on another foundation, committing Maastricht to the flames. Unless there is a further, deeper economic crisis, there is little likelihood of either.

  • Richard Wolff: What is capitalism? What is socialism?

    Socialism

    Definitions of capitalism and socialism vary depending on whom you ask. Above the variety of definitions pieced together from misinformation about each system, there are economic definitions we can draw from based on their usage in the past. Richard Wolff defines capitalism and socialism from an economic perspective in a video by acTVism Munich.

  • Welcome to the new dark ages, where only the wealthy can retire

    Economic Crisis

    What we really need is an intergenerational alliance to be forged around the issue. Any attempt to protect the right to retire (with a pension) will also have to address the dire developments in the employment sector that are seriously disadvantaging younger people and now creeping into jobs held by 40-somethings too. Can this cross-generational solidarity be built?

  • Young workers: An “entitled” generation without entitlements

    Labour

    Now more than ever, we have the material wealth to virtually end poverty, unemployment and social injustice, and yet consistently choose to intensify inequality within and between generations. Ultimately, the branding of millennials as lazy and entitled is essential to justify the intensified destruction of the postwar social contract.

  • Is “Postcapitalism” On the Horizon?

    Socialism

    Together with many left economists, Mason envisages a dismal future of secular stagnation, ever more extreme income inequality, massive job losses due to technological change, unsustainably high levels of public and private debt, and chronic global trade imbalances. He argues that capitalism faces an acute impasse due to catastrophic climate change and pending massive defaults on debt.

  • The sharing economy blues

    Labour

    Today, it seems like this interpretation of the Sharing Economy is everywhere, as journalists, pundits and politicians have lined up to praise its “innovative” promise. Yet is there something more sinister lurking behind the communitarian facade that so often accompanies descriptions of the peer-to-peer online sector?

  • Postal Banking and the Future of Canadian Public Services

    Canadian Business

    But with Postal Banking, the process can be reversed. Canadians don’t need to rely on capitalists to provide social necessities; Canadians don’t need to accept the erosion of economic democracy; and Canadians don’t need to accept a system of economic organization that provides basic services only when they are profitable.

  • Mel Hurtig and the renaissance of economic nationalism

    Canadian Politics

    Today, there is little support for economic nationalism among Canadian business. Conversely, there is little desire among the general population to protect Canadian firms that ultimately don’t want protection. Canadians want trade. But they also want to be protected from economic chaos and run their own show. They want to be masters in their own home.

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