Articles Tagged ‘Economics’

  • Nearly Half of Canadians are Left with $200 or Less After Paying their Monthly Bills and Debt

    Economic Crisis

    Nearly half of Canadians are $200 or less away from financial insolvency each month after paying their bills and debt obligations. This is down 12 points from September 2016, when 56% of Canadians were facing the same challenge. The current 44% who are $200 or less away from financial insolvency includes those who are left with $1-$200 (17%), and the more than one in four (27%) who are left with nothing and already consider themselves insolvent at the end of the month.

  • The Next Financial Crisis Will Be Worse Than the Last One

    Economic Crisis

    We’ve made it through 2017. The first-season installment of presidential Tweetville is ending where it began, on the Palm Beach, Fla., golf course of Mar-a-Lago. Though we are no longer privy to all the footage behind the big white truck, we do know that, given the doubling of its membership fees, others on the course will have higher stakes in the 2018 influence game.

  • For Whom the Wall Fell? A Balance Sheet of the Transition to Capitalism

    Economic Crisis

    Most people’s expectations on November 9, 1989, were that the newly established capitalism in Eastern Europe will result in economic convergence with the rest of Europe, moderate increase in inequality and consolidated democracy. These hopes and expectations are fulfilled most likely in only one country (Poland) and, at the very most, in another two rather small countries (Estonia and Albania).

  • Monetary Imperialism

    Economic Crisis

    The most destructive fiction of international finance is that all debts can be paid, and indeed should be paid, even when this tears economies apart by forcing them into austerity. Yet European countries, and especially Germany, have shied from pressing for a more balanced global economy that would foster growth for all countries and avoid the current economic slowdown and debt deflation.

  • The Current Conflict In Spain Has A Lot to Do With Economic Failure

    Economic Crisis

    As Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy threatens to take over the autonomous region of Catalonia, it is becoming clearer even to casual observers who the bad guys are in this conflict. Generally, when one side is peaceful and seeks dialogue, and the other is committed to resolving the disagreement through force, repression, and violence — well, you get the picture.

  • For the 150th, let’s also re-make our economic myths

    Canadian Business

    Every society needs its myths. But as much as myths and stories can empower, they can also be damaging. Here are three economic myths about Canada that could use re-writing. The first economic myth to remake is that we are “hewers of wood and drawers of water” — or, in more contemporary terms, extractors of some of the dirtiest fossil fuels known to humankind.

  • Trump in the Time of Trumpism


    Most of us don’t like to admit of this litany of the bad. Yet it lives on. Neoliberalism in recent decades has pushed things further. Thatcher famously said that there is no such thing as society. This is dangerous talk for it risks opening the door to authoritarianism, even fascism, the better to fill the void and make people, in the gaze and embrace of the leader, feel they belong.

  • Seattle wants to tax the rich so the poor can afford to live there

    USA Politics

    Seattle has the fourth-highest tax burden for families earning $25,000 among 51 other urban centres, according to a report done by the chief financial officer for the District of Columbia. It is ranked fifth in the United States for its number of millennials earning more than $350,000 a year and is home to six Fortune 500 companies.

  • Economic power to the people!

    Economic Crisis

    Sadly little known today, Robinson was a radical, defiantly outside the mainstream. She engaged the orthodoxy of her day in fiery debates, defending the core belief that the free-market profit system was no way to organize the economy and society. In this, Robinson was very much like the Marxist economists of her day, although she was explicit that she was not a Marxist.

  • The Basic Income debate

    Economic Crisis

    If BI is used to top-up low wages, then it will create incentives for employers who used to pay decent wages to reduce wages so they won’t have to compete with companies that benefit from subsidized labour and, in any case, BI will serve as a public subsidy for cheap labour strategies. That means our precious public dollars will be re-directed into the coffers of corporations, not to human needs.

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