Articles Tagged ‘Culture’

  • ​The Vietnam War, Episodes 9 and 10

    Culture

    As we cross the finish line of The Vietnam War marathon, I want to offer some thoughts about the documentary as a whole. First, despite all the Vietnamese voices it includes, this is a remarkably American film. The soundtrack, for example, is loaded with dozens of familiar and well-amplified 1960s rock songs while the music provided by the multicultural Silk Road Ensemble tends to hum quietly in the background.

  • It’s not just Quebec: The NDP Leadership Race and Racial Dog-whistles

    Canadian Politics

    We have to trust that those people and many others—regardless of the result—can be engaged with a democratic socialist platform based on equality, fairness, and freedom for all Canadians. But if the narrative is that these Singh supporters are seen as little more than ‘ethnic interlopers’ into the party, who could blame them if they don’t feel welcome?

  • Noam Chomsky: Antifa is a ‘major gift to the right’

    Social Movements

    In the UK, anti-fascists mobilised against Blackshirts led by Oswald Moseley, the leader of the British Union of Fascists, in Cable Street in East London in the 1930s and in many other instances. Chomsky has previously warned against conflating the rise of fascism in Europe and the situation in America today. He has also argued that tactics need to be reassessed in the light of the current context.

  • How (Not) to Challenge Racist Violence

    Culture

    As white nationalism and the so-called “alt-Right” have gained prominence in the Trump era, a bipartisan reaction has coalesced to challenge these ideologies. But much of this bipartisan coalition focuses on individual, extreme, and hate-filled mobilizations and rhetoric, rather than the deeper, politer, and apparently more politically acceptable violence that imbues Us foreign and domestic policy.

  • Unhappy birthday

    Canadian Politics

    As Canada commemorates its sesquicentennial with a festival of propaganda, the gulf between this country’s reality and its image — prettily packaged at home and exported around the world — has perhaps never been wider. For evidence, we needn’t look further than the August cover of Rolling Stone exhibiting a photo of Justin Trudeau alongside the question “Is he the free world’s best hope?”

  • Anti-Muslim Violence Is Everywhere—Except in the American Media

    Human Rights

    I can’t even put into words the frustration and anger I feel watching the mainstream media all but ignore this wave of terror being directed against American Muslims. People often look at me and think I’m a white guy. My skin color doesn’t tell you who I am in post 9/11 America, and especially in Trump’s America. I’m Muslim—I’m a minority. Period.

  • ‘Detroit’ Is The Most Irresponsible and Dangerous Movie Of The Year

    Culture

    What makes this film not just sloppy but downright dangerous is that this very denial of black life, this blindness to the experiences and perspectives of black people, makes possible the kind of brutal and discriminatory law enforcement and the lack of accountability around it prevalent in the United States today.

  • Mayweather vs McGregor: a Roman Spectacle of Greed and Vulgarity

    Culture

    The only chance Conor McGregor has of laying a glove on Floyd Mayweather when they meet in the ring is if Mayweather allows him to. But by then it will be too late, as professional boxing will have been dragged through the mud with its reputation tarnished — perhaps beyond repair. Until then we will be forced to suffer the antics of two very rich and very vulgar clowns.

  • When feminism’s wonders aren’t for all women

    Culture

    The reaction to Wonder Woman highlights the perversity and partiality of a feminism that celebrates the cinematic representation of a fictional, purportedly anti-war female superhero, but ignores the non-fictional women (and men) who experience the real brutalities of war and occupation. Such a feminism is neither truly “subversive” nor “revolutionary.”

  • Addiction among the middle class

    In recent years, my newsfeed has played host to a steady trickle of articles documenting the alarming rise of opioid addiction rates in North America. Described by political pundits as a “quiet epidemic,” the explosion in the use and abuse of pharmaceutical opioids — substances with clinical names like oxycodone, fentanyl, hydromorphone — has gone largely unnoticed, media coverage often limited to celebrity overdoses and litanies of dreary statistics.

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