Articles Tagged ‘Canadian Politics’

  • The Working Class: Saskatchewan’s Political Orphan

    Canadian Politics

    When Brad Wall’s Saskatchewan Party swept to power in 2007 the working class and its trade unions were already defeated, unwilling and unprepared to fight back. Wall commenced an assault on labour, rewriting all labour laws in a pro-capitalist direction and effectively banning strikes in the public sector. Wall essentially dared unions to go on strike.

  • Canadian Mining and Popular Resistance

    Canadian Business

    Confronting Canadian capitalism necessarily means a confrontation with the Canadian mining sector. Solidarity with First Nations people requires support for struggles with the mining corporations. Ecologically-responsible production can only occur with democratic and social control of the mining sector.

  • Maybe it’s time for the NDP to return to socialism

    Canadian Politics

    There’s been a strange summer-long silence from the NDP. Last week, after the near terror event in Strathroy, they should have been vocal on Bill C-51, the terror bill. The Liberals looked paralyzed and the Tories had their hard line. The NDP should own this, it was their only winner last election. But they went quiet.

  • Postal Banking and the Future of Canadian Public Services

    Canadian Business

    But with Postal Banking, the process can be reversed. Canadians don’t need to rely on capitalists to provide social necessities; Canadians don’t need to accept the erosion of economic democracy; and Canadians don’t need to accept a system of economic organization that provides basic services only when they are profitable.

  • Mel Hurtig and the renaissance of economic nationalism

    Canadian Politics

    Today, there is little support for economic nationalism among Canadian business. Conversely, there is little desire among the general population to protect Canadian firms that ultimately don’t want protection. Canadians want trade. But they also want to be protected from economic chaos and run their own show. They want to be masters in their own home.

  • Delivering Community Power - Winnipeg

    Environment

    Representatives of Friends of Public Services, the Canadian Union of Postal Workers and Solidarity Winnipeg discuss how Canada Post could become the hub of a post-carbon economy. Speakers include Dru Jay of Friends of Public Services, Basia Sokal of the CUPW and Sofia Soriano and Maya Martinez-Alper of Solidarity Winnipeg.

  • Wall: Sky Darkens for Sunshine Premier

    Canadian Politics

    Despite his glorious history making third term (finally humbling the CCF/NDP, the former natural governing party of the province), Wall’s fresh mandate in office has quickly become a nightmare. The next years look ugly and Wall will bear the responsibility, just as he eagerly took credit for the boom times he squandered during his first two terms.

  • Opposing the Discrimination of the JNF

    Canadian Politics

    In the face of these wild attacks Elizabeth May and the Green leadership needs to stop equivocating on Palestinian rights. Past efforts to mollify the JNF have only emboldened these groups. It is time to show them you won’t be intimidated by respecting the will of the membership and embracing the call for the CRA to revoke the JNF’s charitable status.

  • Work Life: What’s At Stake At Canada Post?

    Labour

    The Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) is currently engaged in collective bargaining with Canada Post. Unlike in previous rounds, the contracts of both the Urban bargaining unit (covering about 42,000 workers) and the unit of some 8,000 Rural and Suburban Mail Carriers (RSMCs) are being negotiated simultaneously.

  • Open Letter to Stéphane Dion re: Ukraine and Russia

    Canadian Politics

    When your government came into office last fall you inherited Harper’s foreign policy towards Ukraine and Russia which was in lock-step with that of the USA. My purpose in writing to you was to alert your new government to the fact that there was considerable evidence that for a variety of reasons Harper’s foreign policy positions were at variance with the reality of the situation.

Page 1 of 23