Articles Tagged ‘Canadian Left’

  • One NDPer’s Position on the Leadership Contest

    Canadian Politics

    This list and its rationale is my personal opinion and should be taken as such. Nevertheless, it is my hope that this helps participants shore up their list, even if they disagree with my ultimate interpretation. Any of the four hopefuls will make a great leader, and will have three people willing to help them implement their vision for a just Canada.

  • NDP Leadership Race: A Labour-Themed Debate Brings Most Substance Yet

    Canadian Politics

    Much is still at stake for 2019, and while Trudeau remains strong, his father in 1972 lost his Trudeaumania majority, nearly lost power altogether, and had to depend on the David Lewis NDP to keep it. Even if 2019 doesn’t bring an NDPer into 24 Sussex, the chosen leader could wield immense power and influence.

  • Second NDP Leadership Debate: With Youth Issues as Backdrop, Differences Start to Emerge

    Canadian Politics

    This time around, the focus on youth issues showcased greater specificity, and thus brought out both different positions, along with divergent means to reach similar ends. The politics of pineapple pizza aside, even the ‘lightning round’ questions were more substantive this time. All of this means that an undecided NDP member was given some guidance about who they may support.

  • First NDP Leadership Debate: A good introduction, but not a lot of differentiation

    Canadian Politics

    How does Angus materialize his ‘got your back’ philosophy into a platform? How does Julian plan to address free post-secondary schooling in a federalist scheme that gives educational powers to the provinces? How will Ashton determine the parameters of her commitment to greater public ownership? And in what way will Caron structure a Basic Income to ensure working Canadians aren’t quagmired in greater inequality?

  • Outflanking the NDP: the Liberals and the Left

    Canadian Politics

    For Canadians of a certain age, it is tempting to see the results of the 2015 federal election as Back to the Future. The Liberal Party that dominated Canadian politics from the 1890s into the first decade of the 21st century is once again in office, and the prime minister is the son of a former Liberal PM who presided over the country for more than 15 years.

  • Lament for a Party that has lost its way

    Canadian Politics

    In due course, with such a meaningful platform and a dynamic leader who would support these causes, the NDP might be able to win the support of the Canadian public. Canada could then have a government that could change the course of history for this country.

  • From Minimum Wage to Minimum Program

    Canadian Politics

    Demands for a living wage must be seen as barely the beginning of what needs to be a comprehensive campaign for better paying jobs and greater income equality. We need to shift from a minimum wage to a minimum program.

  • How big ideas become government policy

    Thirty-five years ago the policies that now define democratic governance — or rather anti-democratic — in Canada were literally unthinkable. Voluntarily giving up, through reckless tax cuts, hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue needed for running the country (and provinces); the fire sale disposal of some of the countries most valuable, efficient and productive crown corporations; the signing of corporate rights agreements like NAFTA that severely constrain elected governments from legislating on behalf of their citizens; the ruthless slashing of social spending; and the deliberate driving down of salaries and wages by government policy – all now commonplace and once unthinkable.

  • Leading questions

    While the times call for bold alternatives and transformative change, the NDP candidates with left sympathies have shown no imagination for how to build power or intervene in the political landscape in a way that is significantly different from the right-wing candidates. The differences that matter in this race are mostly about technical competence and style, rather than politics.

  • Politics après Jack

    Culture

    When Jack Layton, newly minted Leader of the Opposition in Canada’s parliament, died on August 22, even politically indifferent Canadians took serious notice. Here was a political death that could dramatically affect the country’s future. What might the actual impact of Layton’s loss be, not just on the federal political landscape, but on the New Democratic Party, on Québec, and the “larger Left” in general? We asked observers on the front line to consider those questions.

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