Articles Tagged ‘Canada’

  • Energy producers have an obligation to improve environmental reporting

    Environment

    Public demand for further consideration of environmental concerns from energy producers and transmitters will only continue to grow. Hydroelectricity has major social and environmental advantages as a renewable energy source, but the industry is not meeting modern standards of corporate social responsibility as far as clearly reporting the planning and monitoring procedures to the public.

  • Tell Trudeau to reject the Trans-Pacific Partnership!

    Globalization

    Winnipeggers attended a townhall meeting at the University of Winnipeg about the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a multilateral trade agreement that threatens our jobs, our environment and our sovereignty. Hosted by the Canadian Labour Congress, the panel included President Hassan Yussuff President, Canadian Labour Congress President Maude Barlow and many more.

  • Maude Barlow: Government Neglect, Corporate Abuse, and Canada’s Water Crisis

    Environment

    Council of Canadians Chair Maude Barlow discusses her latest book, Boiling Point: Government Neglect, Corporate Abuse, and Canada’s Water Crisis with Paul Moist at McNally Robinson Booksellers. Barlow is one of the world’s foremost water activists and she has been on the front lines of the world’s water crises for the past 20 years.

  • Young workers: An “entitled” generation without entitlements

    Labour

    Now more than ever, we have the material wealth to virtually end poverty, unemployment and social injustice, and yet consistently choose to intensify inequality within and between generations. Ultimately, the branding of millennials as lazy and entitled is essential to justify the intensified destruction of the postwar social contract.

  • Trudeau’s promises unravel in legal battle over Indigenous rights

    Canadian Politics

    Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party campaigned on the promise of a “renewed, nation-to-nation relationship” between the government and Indigenous communities. Trudeau promised the Assembly of First Nations that he would govern “not only in accordance with constitutional obligations, but also with those enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”

  • Basic income: libertarian wedge or a plank towards a socialist future?

    Labour

    In recent years, the popularity of a basic Income (BI), has grown. Fittingly, the topic has garnered thoughtful debate and analysis from across the Canadian left, including in the Summer 2016 issue of Canadian Dimension, where the concept was explored both as potential policy, but also as part of a broader philosophical and ideological discussion.

  • Yves Engler: A Propaganda System

    Canadian Politics

    Author, journalist and activist Yves Engler was at the University of Winnipeg to promote his most recent book, A Propaganda System: How Canada’s government, corporations, media and academia sell war and exploitation, released recently by Fernwood Publishing and RED Publishing. Yves has published eight other books and written hundreds of articles in less than a decade.

  • The Munk School of Global Affairs and University Propaganda

    Education

    The Munk School of Global Affairs reveals much about the state of foreign-policy debate in this country. Among 35 million Canadians, the University of Toronto would be hard pressed to find a less credible source of support for the study of international affairs. Peter Munk is a right wing ideologue and mining magnate with an important personal stake in a particular foreign policy.

  • Unifor and Big Three Bargaining

    Labour

    The militant demand that Unifor has advanced in these negotiations offers a challenge to the fundamental terrain of corporate power through mobilizing members to strike for investment, and should be applauded by progressives and seen for what it is: a victory for autoworkers and a basis for further mobilization. Ultimately, I remain convinced that workers know what they’re doing.

  • Rebel Youth offers depth but lacks dimension

    Rebel Youth is ordered by two claims. The first is that the explosion of defiant youthful anti-authoritarianism in the cultural arena, rebellious uprisings of young wildcat strikers in 1965-1966, the rise of New Left opposition and protest, and young radicals’ support for a series of 1969-1972 strikes need all be understood as “aspects of a single youth phenomenon.”

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