Articles

  • The US-NATO Invasion of Libya Destroyed the Country Beyond All Recognition

    Africa

    The UN’s Martin Kobler warned of a ‘dangerous escalation’ in Libya. That phrase sounds shopworn. It has been used so often. There is no end to the war. Like a moving kaleidoscope the fighters change sides. Their loyalties are hard to read. It is even harder to understand the suffering of the people. At NATO headquarters they still smirk about their successful war in Libya. It is a war that broke this country.

  • Fighting for union justice on the streets

    Labour

    In Windsor, Ontario, when the Downtown Windsor Business Improvement Association paid to install iron-spiked railings where panhandlers sit, the organization which called attention to it was the Street Labourers of Windsor (SLOW). They also took a stand when the city intended to install “care meters,” in which people can drop change, instead of giving directly to panhandlers.

  • What we need is a working-class politics

    Labour

    Is the labour movement better positioned today to influence and affect meaningful change than under Harper?There is no doubt that unions have much to celebrate with his defeat just over a year ago. The Liberal government has reversed the most offensive of Harper’s anti-labour legislation and, in rhetoric at least, seems to have a more positive relationship with the labour movement.

  • Profits, Coercion, and Resistance in Latin America

    Canadian Business

    What forms have Canadian capitalist expansion and Canadian state interference in Latin America assumed in recent decades? How have Latin American workers, peasants, and indigenous communities – dispossessed and exploited by Canadian capital – responded in turn? What precisely are the contours of this dialectic of accumulation by dispossession and popular resistance?

  • Housing in the age of austerity: Toronto’s war on the poor

    Canadian Politics

    It wasn’t always this bad for Toronto’s non-rich residents. In 1970, 66 per cent of Toronto neighbourhoods were middle-income. This was when the labour market allowed for single-income families, when social services were better available to the poor and when affordable housing was constructed according to need.

  • Interview: Andrew Bacevich on American militarism

    USA Politics

    The election of Donald Trump raised serious questions about the direction of US foreign policy. Would the president seek better diplomatic relations with Russia? Would he step up, or deescalate, conflict in the Middle East? So far, there are few indications this Republican administration will change course from that of its predecessor.

  • 150 Years of Marx’s Capital

    Socialism

    Capital is foremost a dissection of the historical social relations and mode of production of capitalism. From its initial publication, Marx’s Capital steadily gained prominence as the indispensable point of departure for understanding the inner workings of the capitalist system and the forces polarizing the accumulation of wealth on the one side and poverty on the other.

  • Nazis, NATO, and Canada’s Latvian Love-in

    Canadian Politics

    The official spin on NATO deploying some 4,000 troops — including an estimated 450 Canadians — into the Baltic States is that this will be a tangible deterrent to the evil Russians. Such a bold troop deployment right on the Russian border could also be viewed as an unnecessary provocation towards the Kremlin.

  • Evidence of good faith lacking in Trudeau’s Indigenous agenda

    Canadian Politics

    We gave Trudeau’s government more than a year to put some good faith on the table. Instead, we see a lot of talk but very little substantive action on the matters that matter most to us. If our right to free, informed and prior consent before development on our lands is not respected, that is the equivalent of breaching our Aboriginal, treaty and title rights. How does that make him any different from Harper?

  • Canada complicit in crafting colonial policies for Palestine

    Canadian Politics

    Many Canadian political leaders were overjoyed by the Balfour Declaration. Several years after the First World War, Conservative Party leader Arthur Meighen, a Christian Zionist, claimed, “of all the results of the (war), none was more important and more fertile in human history than the reconquest of Palestine and the rededication of that country to the Jewish people.”

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