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Fernwood 2021/22 leaderboard

Socialism

  • Resisting sectarianism, growing the left

    Today, in a time of overlapping crises and fast-paced social media cultures, sectarianism has taken on new and destructive forms. We regularly put energy into tearing down the efforts of others who share many of our aims but who we see as wrong-headed. But many of us, as activists and organizers, are exhausted from cycling through teardowns and hungry for something more constructive.

  • Cuba: The single party system confronts the crisis

    Single party bureaucratic socialism creates a kind of political demiurge that escapes the rule of law, since it places itself above it, accentuates political extremism and separates itself from the citizenry. So far all models with these characteristics, far from leading to a socialist society, have disguised a state capitalism with features of corruption and elitism. It is time to debate this and organize ourselves to change it.

  • Richie Rich goes to space

    As repugnant as these nouveau-cowboy colonizers are, they are not, as individuals, the problem: they are expressions of a system that is destroying the earth and exploiting working people, cleverly justified with an ideology of do-good philanthropy. They are given too much of a free ride by an uncritical media. The answer to polluting industry on earth is not to send it to the moon but create socialist solutions on earth.

  • Beyond the socialist impasse: Remembering Leo Panitch

    In this webinar, leading figures from the left in Canada and the United States reflect on the legacy of Leo Panitch, Professor Emeritus of Politics at York University and editor of the Socialist Register. Leo passed away in December 2020. Panitch is the author of more than 100 scholarly articles and nine books including The Making of Global Capitalism, written with his close friend and university colleague Sam Gindin.

  • The July 11 protests in Cuba

    Protests began in Cuba on July 11, and a clear transformation in the institutional political discourse has occurred in recent days. Since the president’s J-11 “combat order,” the language has progressively transitioned to a vocabulary of conciliation and calls for solidarity, unity, and peace. That matters. Now, an extensive discussion and political transformation that allows the protests to be processed is essential.

  • Avi Lewis and the NDP: Why stars don’t point the way forward for the left

    The real challenges for the left today are not about big names and bold ideas. They’re about identity and mobilization. We’ve been led to believe that elections are about individual voters examining parties and their policies like consumers looking for the best deal while parties are policy entrepreneurs just trying to meet consumer demands. But research on voters and party behaviour doesn’t support such a view.

  • Can Avi Lewis carry on the success of his family’s electoral tradition?

    At a time when concerted effort is required to address the overlapping crises of the climate, the COVID-19 pandemic, economic inequality, and racial injustice, perhaps more activists should, in fact, seek a seat in the House of Commons. And maybe, when the votes are counted in the next federal election, there will be another Lewis pounding on the desk, demanding justice and equality for all Canadians.

  • Prospects for the NDP

    While we should guard against illusions, there are reasons to be optimistic about the current prospects for the federal NDP and what I have called a “rekindling of democratic socialism.” The NDP seem set to offer a clear left alternative to the Liberals. That is good news indeed, not just in electoral terms, but also in terms of rekindling democratic socialism.

  • Avi Lewis has the moral courage to add substance to the NDP

    At this critical time a voice that challenges the power of capital is a welcome prospect. Avi Lewis is not afraid to ask and tackle the tough questions we face collectively. He has both the moral courage and the policy credentials that have the potential to add substance to the NDP. The party must embrace the opportunity that his candidacy represents.

  • Can Avi Lewis inject new life into the New Democrats?

    Avi Lewis sees his role as part of a rising progressive group of politicians. The challenge before us is epic. But in the cataclysmic times we are living in, anything is possible, even reforming the NDP. Just like the Waffle emerged in the tumultuous 1960s, so a new feminist, anti-racist, eco-socialist movement can emerge today inside the NDP. That is my hope and I know that Avi will be part of making it happen.

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