Articles Reviews

  • Rebel Youth offers depth but lacks dimension

    Rebel Youth is ordered by two claims. The first is that the explosion of defiant youthful anti-authoritarianism in the cultural arena, rebellious uprisings of young wildcat strikers in 1965-1966, the rise of New Left opposition and protest, and young radicals’ support for a series of 1969-1972 strikes need all be understood as “aspects of a single youth phenomenon.”

  • The “People’s Poet” in three dimensions

    The entire artifact — book and CD together —becomes a multimedia portrait of a fascinating man whose family and class allegiances, fierce intelligence and demanding friendship were obviously a challenge and a joy for those around him. Acorn’s reputation as a Marxist curmudgeon was the one I was most familiar with when I picked up this book.

  • Conflict, Coercion, and Settler Colonialism in Western Canada

    Reviews

    The Pass System is an important documentary that is a must-watch for teachers, researchers, and activists of all kinds. In light of the Idle No More movement and ongoing pipeline protests, the film reminds us of the different ways in which the state, in the name of nation-building, tries to contain Indigenous resistance to facilitate capitalist accumulation by colonial dispossession.

  • Pacifying Palestinians and Pacifying the World

    Middle East

    Yet whether we think of Syria as the paradigm of twenty-first century warfare or the Israeli matrix of control, it is “the people,” or a mobilized segment, that is being victimized. Halper’s book does the best job so far of depicting this new cartography of warfare, and deserves to be widely read and its main theses debated.

  • A blueprint for Canada’s energy policy

    When Ralph Nader called Gordon Laxer’s book After the Sands “a myth-destroying blockbuster” it couldn’t have been better put. This is a long-overdue insightful analysis of not only Canada’s oil and gas industry, but also the economic and political framework within which it operates.

  • Is representational democracy possible?

    Policy wonks can look to this book for working examples of labour value realization, as well as untested frontiers of social libertarian public policy that respond to a neoliberal capitalist system that is failing most of whom it’s supposed to represent.

  • The Bloody History of Accumulation by Dispossession

    Despite its many flaws, The Revenant provides a popular portrayal of the bloody birth of capitalism that can potentially spark critical conversations about the nature of capitalist accumulation by colonial dispossession in the past and present.

  • Debriefing Elsipogtog: the Anatomy of a Struggle

    Miles Howe broke the story about fracking and showed how far the New Brunswick government, the U.S. company SWN Resources and the police were willing to go to open the province to fracking. Howe also demonstrated the commitment of Aboriginal people, and some white settler communities in the poorest province in Canada, to fight the destruction of their land and water.

  • Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied

    Highway of Tears also calls on Canadians to demand a national inquiry and argues that Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples need to forge social movement alliances to effectively combat the root causes of the issue: poverty, racism, and gender discrimination. But time is of the essence. Justice delayed is justice denied.

  • Media discourse and the Cuban question

    The breadth and incisiveness of Lamrani’s research is on display, as before. And yet – or therefore – the author slips at times into the role of apologist. Fair enough, when deployed in the right argument – but here it only saps the book of its force.

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