Articles Labour

  • Young workers: An “entitled” generation without entitlements

    Labour

    Now more than ever, we have the material wealth to virtually end poverty, unemployment and social injustice, and yet consistently choose to intensify inequality within and between generations. Ultimately, the branding of millennials as lazy and entitled is essential to justify the intensified destruction of the postwar social contract.

  • Ford Unifor Agreement Ratified: Voted Down at Oakville Unit, Local 707

    Labour

    The germs of organization developing in Oshawa – all point in the direction of possible, new life for a collective resistance to the current regime in auto. Learning about the legacy of resistance, struggle, internal battles inside the union and the role of socialists – going back to the 1930s – is a key component of building on the real frustration and anger of today’s young workers.

  • Disillusioned by Leadership, Many Union Rank-and-File Turned to Trump

    Labour

    This is not a generation that’s going to stand by and let this congress and the fossil fuel industry destroy their prospects for health. It’s not going to happen. The climate crisis is going to overwhelm us unless we address it directly and this young generation understands that. I think that’s where it goes. That this is a movement moment greater than we had anticipated.

  • Orgreave: Winning the battle means winning the war

    Labour

    The truth about the Battle of Orgreave paints an incriminating picture of the neoliberal capitalist state, the police and mainstream media. For this reason, the government will attempt to block any inquiry. They know that if the truth is acknowledged, the structural foundations and imagery of neoliberal society will begin to crumble.

  • Basic income: libertarian wedge or a plank towards a socialist future?

    Labour

    In recent years, the popularity of a basic Income (BI), has grown. Fittingly, the topic has garnered thoughtful debate and analysis from across the Canadian left, including in the Summer 2016 issue of Canadian Dimension, where the concept was explored both as potential policy, but also as part of a broader philosophical and ideological discussion.

  • Unifor and Big Three Bargaining

    Labour

    The militant demand that Unifor has advanced in these negotiations offers a challenge to the fundamental terrain of corporate power through mobilizing members to strike for investment, and should be applauded by progressives and seen for what it is: a victory for autoworkers and a basis for further mobilization. Ultimately, I remain convinced that workers know what they’re doing.

  • After big election promises, Trudeau Liberals sell a future without job security for young Canadians

    Canadian Politics

    The Liberals need to be clear with Canadians where their long term outlook lies. Is it with the election 2015 idea that we can offer a decent life for young workers, or is it with the idea that job security is a luxury we can no longer afford? After a year of observation, my suspicion is that the latter is their genuine belief, while the former was a tactical choice to win votes.

  • Big Three Bargaining: Different Ways of Making History

    Labour

    The time seemed ripe to lead a reversal in the labour movement’s trajectory – but this was not even tried. That failure defines what was in fact ‘historic’ about the 2016 agreement: it was not the highly overblown claims of the union’s achievements, but the confirmation of the end of the union’s leadership legacy within the labour and social movements.

  • Jim Naylor: The Fate of Labour Socialism

    Labour

    Professor James Naylor talks about his exciting new book: The Fate of Labour Socialism: The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and the Dream of a Working-Class Future. The book is a fundamental reexamination of the CCF and Canadian working-class politics in the 1930s, one that will help historians better understand Canada’s political, intellectual, and labour history.

  • The sharing economy blues

    Labour

    Today, it seems like this interpretation of the Sharing Economy is everywhere, as journalists, pundits and politicians have lined up to praise its “innovative” promise. Yet is there something more sinister lurking behind the communitarian facade that so often accompanies descriptions of the peer-to-peer online sector?

Page 3 of 16