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Indigenous Politics

  • All Eyes on Wet’suwet’en: International Call for Week of Solidarity

    Unceded and sovereign Wet’suwet’en land is under attack. On December 31, 2019, BC Supreme Court Justice Marguerite Church granted an injunction against members of the Wet’suwet’en nation who have been stewarding and protecting our traditional territories from the destruction of multiple pipelines.

  • Is reconciliation a peaceful process?

    On the international stage, Canada portrays itself as peaceful state; however, the reality is quite different for our Original Peoples that remain in a colonial grip. Words have a history. Words from the past have the ability to colonize the present. Words shape and create reality. “Reconciliation” is a concept that requires an investigation, given Canada’s ongoing genocidal colonial past and present.

  • Trudeau Called on to Stop Land Fraud as Kanehsatake Hunger Strike Ends

    In a press release, the Kanien’kehá:ka of Kanehsatà:ke renewed their call for justice, inviting Trudeau to meet and negotiate an end to the land dispute, which has been going on for 302 years too long. Canadian Dimension stands with the Kanien’kéha:ka (Mohawk) of Kanehsatà:ke and proudly publishes their full press release.

  • Where the parties stand on Indigenous issues

    This year’s federal election campaign has seen a significant drop in priority for Indigenous issues, especially in terms of the federal leaders’ debate and their campaign commentary. This stands in stark contrast to the 2015 election campaign, which saw Liberal leader Justin Trudeau centre his campaign on rebuilding Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples.

  • All Eyes on Kanehsatake: What You Need to Know about the Hunger Strike to Stop Colonial Land Fraud

    Trudeau was elected, in part, on a platform of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. Though apologies and financial compensation are important steps in the right direction, meaningful reconciliation in Canada also requires the return of stolen land. Canadians, and the world, must pay close attention to the situation in Kanehsatà:ke to ensure that 2019 ends with negotiated peace and justice and not more conflict and bloodshed.

  • Kanesatake Resident Begins Hunger Strike to Protest Ongoing Colonial Land Fraud

    Earlier this summer, Sean Carleton sat down with Ellen Gabriel to talk about the recent developments Kanehsatà:ke. Canadian Dimension stands with the Kanien’kéha:ka (Mohawk) of Kanehsatà:ke and proudly publishes their full press release about the hunger strike to protest ongoing colonial land fraud.

  • Trudeau Refuses to Stop Land Fraud: Press Release of the Mohawks of Kanehsatake

    Earlier this summer, Sean Carleton sat down with Ellen Gabriel to talk about the recent developments Kanehsatà:ke. As of 29 August, Trudeau is refusing to meet with the Mohawks and declare a temporary moratorium on development so that a peaceful resolution to ongoing tensions can be negotiated. This is unacceptable. CD stands with the Kanien’kéha:ka (Mohawk) of Kanehsatà:ke and proudly publishes their most recent press release.

  • Canada Must Stop Land Fraud: Press Release of the Mohawks of Kanesatake

    On 21 August 2019, Ellen Gabriel and other Kanien’kéha:ka held a press conference in the Pines, the site of the so-called “Oka Crisis”, to address the ongoing land fraud in their homelands. They are giving Justin Trudeau and the Government of Canada 10 days to intervene in the 300-year long land dispute and to stop all illegal development in Kanehsatà:ke.

  • ‘This is Our Land’: An Interview with Ellen Gabriel about Ongoing Land Fraud at Kanesatake

    For the Kanien’kéha:ka (Mohawk) of Kanehsatà:ke, the return of stolen land – fraudulently sold first by a religious order and then by the municipality of Oka, Quebec and the Government of Canada – has been at the heart of their demands for 300 years. Mohawk resistance to the ongoing theft of Kanien’kéha:ka homelands is well-known. Most notably, in the summer of 1990, during the so-called “Oka Crisis,” Mohawks defended a forested area known as the Pines from development.

  • The colonization of reconciliation

    Canada must finally legally recognize Indigenous Peoples as fully sovereign and self-governing peoples. Mohawk lawyer Stephen John Ford has persuasively argued that with recognition of sovereignty “comes the necessary redistribution of wealth which will remove the yoke of dependence and control exerted over First Nations by the federal government. Indigenous sovereignty will also provide First Nation jurisdictional control over their territories to protect the lands and waters.

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