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Human Rights

  • Bhopal’s Healing Wounds

    Those unfortunate enough to reside in the poorest areas of Bhopal continue to live a life of pain and neglect in the shadow of Union Carbides poisonous legacy, almost 26 years on from that tragic night when 27 tonnes of Methyl Isocyanate gas descended on Bhopal’s shanty-towns.

  • Sexism and assault in ‘Torontonamo’ jails brings more shame to G20

    In light of the massive human rights violations we saw in Toronto in the midst of the G20 summit, the RebELLEs movement is putting out a mass call to action, to denounce this unprecedented repression of political dissent in Canada and to stand in solidarity with those victimized by the state.

  • Burying Haitians Alive

    I am profoundly skeptical about history: how we teach history and how we learn history. People imagine their place in the world on the basis of what has come before them and where – based on that trajectory – they are going.

  • Xenoracism and the Hypocrisy of Managed Migration

    There are 125 million people who are displaced in this world. Who are these people? Where are they from? And what are the causes of their displacement?

  • Solidarity Across Borders

    Canada tends to take pride in its humanitarian tradition of providing protection to thousands of refugees who fear persecution, or who are at risk of torture or cruel and unusual treatment. Despite this popular image, however, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) and the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) are both highly flawed institutions, which often fail to protect those seeking asylum.

    For example, members of Solidarity Across Borders (SAB), a Montreal-based coalition of self-organized refugees and their allies, recently received a call from Lilia Diaz. Telephoning in tears from Mexico, Diaz told us that she and her family are living clandestinely in the constant fear of being discovered and attacked, since their deportation from Canada this past summer back to the country they had fled.

  • Newfoundland Women Want Pay Equity Too

    More than 25 years after the adoption of the Charter, the obligation to implement pay equity is still unmet. A test case for why the legal obligation to implement pay equity remains unfulfilled has recently been played out in Canada’s courts and federal/provincial system involving unionized female health-care workers in Newfoundland.

  • Honour Killings

    When a young female reporter joined the staff of The Jordan Times in 1993, “honour” killings were a dirty secret. For Rana Husseini, however, then newly assigned to the paper’s crime beat, “honour” killings provided a suspiciously uncomfortable amount of copy. She took on the mantle of uncovering this silent-but-deadly aspect of Jordanian life.

  • Canadian crimes in Haiti: Beyond complicity

    In light of the graphic and well documented human-rights reports coming out of Haiti, the Canadian government has a number of serious questions to answer. It is doubtful that Canada has ever been so heavily implicated in an illegal intervention in Latin America and the Caribbean as it has in the case of Haiti.

  • Drawing the Line on Anti-Semitism

    Remember Tolstoy’s “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way”? Genocides and war are like that, too. They are each incomparable. As you surely know, millions of Jewish people like me (together with a substantial contingent of homosexuals, Communists, Roma and others) were cattle-carred to Nazi concentration camps, subjected to horrific medical experiments, labour to death, gassing and other inhuman ways to live and die.

  • The Contemporary Struggle against Racism in Canada

    Racism continues to be manifest in various ways in Canadian society. It is not a distant “bad” memory, something that previous generations practiced and experienced. Many Canadians acknowledge some history of racial oppression and the need to address it. But efforts are often limited by the habitual contrast of Canadian racism with American racism in a way that encourages moral superiority, drawing on such artifacts as the underground railroad.

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