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Human Rights

  • Ontario NDP has no answers for Toronto’s homeless death crisis

    There’s no reason why this needs to be viewed as a crisis only for the currently poor, either. The economic shifts and the effects of austerity described by research coalition Homeless Hub, affect all working people in Toronto. In Globalization, Precarious Work and the Food Bank, Lightman, Mitchell and Herd write that with the onset of grinding austerity brought about by the Common Sense Revolution in 1995 , the number of food bank users in Toronto jumped from 115,000 to 170,000.

  • BDS movement nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

    Norwegian parliamentarian Bjørnar Moxnes has officially nominated the BDS movement for Palestinian rights for a Nobel Peace Prize. He did so with the support of his party, the progressive Rødt (Red) Party, explaining why BDS “should be supported without reservation by all democratically-minded people and states.” The following is his statement on nominating the BDS Movement for Palestinian Rights for a Nobel Peace Prize.

  • Statement on anniversary of Québec mosque shooting

    We are honoured to be part of a growing movement claiming solidarity among diverse peoples and the earth. This is our time and our future. We commemorate the tragic anniversary of January 29th with our hearts and souls. By naming the denial and narrow-mindedness in our nation, we hope to honour the lives of Ibrahima, Mamadou, Khaled, Abdelkrim, Azzeddine and Aboubaker.

  • ‘I won’t fly refugees to their deaths’: The El Al pilots resisting deportation

    In recent weeks the Israeli government approved the deportation of refugees to third countries. According to the plan, the Holot desert detention facility, where many asylum seekers are held, will shut down and those who refuse to leave “voluntarily” to Rwanda and Uganda (and perhaps other countries) will be imprisoned indefinitely. According to numerous reports, which Rwanda and Uganda have denied, Israel will pay those countries $5,000 for each refugee they take in from Israel.

  • Justice for Hassan Diab and the unbearable banality of evil

    The next few weeks will hopefully see Dr. Diab home with his family and with the large number of people who have worked for his release and full exoneration. Understanding his ordeal should motivate fundamental change to Canada’s extradition law and yield insights about the sociology and politics of injustice. Questions arise about how and why the banality of a small number of people can wreak havoc on the justice system and cause torment to many.

  • Resurgence or revelation? White nationalist legacies in Canada

    If we don’t feel uncomfortable, then we are not in reconciliation. Reconciliation was never intended to be a feel-good process. The acknowledgement of historical atrocities, the revelation of Canada’s white nationalist and racist foundations, and the transfer of wealth and power back to Indigenous peoples are going to make lots of people very uncomfortable and maybe even angry. But imagine how Indigenous peoples have felt all these decades, going to schools named after those who tried to kill us off.

  • Race, class, and the revolt of the Black athlete

    The Black Freedom struggle has always been a class struggle; for the US context, just read WEB Dubois on the “general strike of the slaves” that turned a war to save the Union into a war to end slavery. In short, in a multibillion-dollar business highly dependent on Black labour, the revolt of the Black athlete is not a race struggle or a class struggle; it’s both.

  • The ordeal of Hassan Diab

    Hassan Diab’s defenders include Amnesty International, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, the Canadian Association of University Teachers, Independent Jewish Voices, Union Juive Francaise pour La Paix (France). Counted among his many supporters are Noam Chomsky, Canadian filmmaker John Greyson, and Monia Mazigh.

  • McGill University and the Jewish National Fund

    Imagine the outcry if a McGill department accepted a large donation to work with an organization that openly excluded Jews and others who “delegitimize, demonize, or apply a double standard to Palestine and fail to recognize Palestinians’ UN enshrined rights.” It’s time to discuss the McGill administration’s support for Jewish/white supremacy in the Middle East.

  • Why is Canadian labour so slow to support BDS?

    In the South African anti-apartheid struggle, the tide turned when rank and file activists organized in union halls and on convention floors in support of the international boycott movement. Today, Palestine solidarity activists within the labour movement must come together, chart a strategy to educate, mobilize and organize workers to support the Palestinian people

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