Articles Culture

  • The Popular Front: An “Alternative Year in Review” of 2016 Pop Culture

    Culture

    2016 produced a Trump presidency and witnessed the rise of the “alt-right” and increasing violence against women, workers, and Indigenous, LGBTQ2, and racialized peoples. 2016 also saw the approval of new pipelines, Brexit, and the deaths of pop culture legends like Prince, Phife Dawg, and David Bowie and revolutionary figures like Muhammad Ali and Fidel Castro.

  • Clear the Way for the Prophets of Rage

    Culture

    It was RATM guitarist Tom Morello’s idea to form the Prophets of Rage to counter the current political climate, specifically in the United States. With Zack de le Rocha uninterested in a RATM reunion, Morello and the rest of the band reached out to legendary MCs Chuck D and B-Real to pool their collections of protest songs and launch an attack on the status quo. We should be glad they did.

  • Theorizing a new radicalism: Henry Giroux on how to change the world

    Culture

    In the overlapping realms of cultural studies and critical theory, few scholars have made a more significant impact upon contemporary educational theory than Henry Giroux. In 2002, the American-Canadian academic was named by the British publisher Routledge as one of the top fifty educational thinkers of the modern period.

  • Pope Francis: Capitalism is ‘Terrorism Against All of Humanity’

    Culture

    Pope Francis surprised reporters on a flight from Krakow to the Vatican late Sunday when he blamed the “god of money” for extremist violence in Europe and the Middle East, saying that a ruthless global economy leads disenfranchised people to violence. The pope said that no religion has a monopoly on violence.

  • Muhammad Ali Understood the Racist Roots of War and Militarism

    Culture

    His incandescent presence that night made undeniably clear, once again, that the movements against war and racism that Ali so eloquently spoke for — and that he remained such an elemental and principled part of — had already succeeded in transforming public discourse, if not yet public policy, across the United States.

  • A is for Activist: Igniting children’s radical imaginations

    Culture

    A is for Activist is the most recent addition to the field of radical children’s literature, but it is by no means the first revolutionary children’s book. In fact, there is a long history of oppositional children’s storytelling, from socialist primers in the 1910s to the anti-authoritarian and contrarian sensibilities of stories from authors such as Dr. Seuss in the 1960s and 1970s.

  • Separate but equal: False equality and the political exclusion of children

    Culture

    But whereas the recognition of moral equality for marginalized groups served as a foundation upon which their political equality would be established, children have never been recognized as fully equal. The effect has been disastrous, for moral equality without political equality is simply false equality.

  • On Childhood: Introduction

    Culture

    The contributors to this special focus section on childhood offer potent challenges to this all-too-common line of interpretation. In none of the articles that follow will you find analyses that treat the period between “infancy” and “adolescence” as a kind of pre-political period of formation. Nor will you find pat venerations of youthful “ignorance.”

  • Changing the world with comedy

    Culture

    Ryan McMahon’s path is an important one and, by sharing his experiences through his work, he is clearing the way for others interested in using humour to be heard and change the world with comedy. For more on McMahon’s hard-hitting and hilarious work, including his comedy specials and Red Man Laughing podcasts, check out his website at rmcomedy.com.

  • The Popular Front: An “Alternative Year in Review” of 2015 Pop Culture

    Culture

    This list showcases elements of progressive popular culture from the past year that aim to change the world. There are a lot of great socialist, feminist, anti-racist, and decolonial works produced every year – but it is hard to keep track of them all.

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