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Canadian Politics

  • The Charest Factor

    It is an inescapable fact that, since the 1995 referendum, Québec politics have been dominated by two of Brian Mulroney’s former cabinet ministers. The first, Lucien Bouchard, made his way to the top post of the Parti Québécois (PQ) to replace the fallen Jacques Parizeau. The second, Jean Charest, a much younger politician, was pushed to the head of the Parti Libéral du Québec (PLQ) by the federal Liberals in order to fill the void left by the dull and uncharismatic Daniel Johnson Jr.

  • Labour report: labour battles in B.C. and Quebec

    Recent political developments do not bode well for unionized public-sector workers. While the decisive defeat of the Tories in Ontario is welcome news, the actions of the provincial Liberals reveal they have no intention of undoing the damage inflicted by Mike Harris.

  • Editorial: Run-Up To The 2004 Federal Election

    The business establishment was never happy with the split in the ranks of the Tories that followed the collapse of the Mulroney regime. Bay Street always likes an acceptable fallback to the party in office, a second party committed to its agenda in case the first one falters and is unable to deliver.

  • Top 10 Canadian NGO strategies & tactics to combat climate change

    Canadian environmental organizations play a wide range of roles in combating climate change. Some analyze and popularize the science and impacts of climate change, some challenge industry and many target governments. Others are focused on long-term public education campaigns, grassroots initiatives and building the movement.

  • Editorial: Racism in Canada

    As part of our plans to celebrate CD’s 40 years of publication, our Editorial Collective asked certain writers to reflect on racism in Canada and consider whether or not it has diminished over this forty-year time span. Their excellent contributions appear in this issue of Dimension.

  • Remembrance and censorship

    By the time this commentary appears, another mawkish, duplicitous Remembrance Day will be history. Editors, writers, producers and photographers will have looked for new ways to honor Canada’s War Dead – though not very hard – and will likely have settled for yet another shot of the dwindling parade of fragile veterans who appear faithfully every year to fill what’s known among journalists as “the November Hole.”

  • Jean Charest’s ideological soft soap that verges on the demagogic

    The “conservative” Prime Minister Jean Charest has tried to justify his re-engineering project in an open letter addressed to the men and women of Quebec published two days ago. Quebecois have become increasingly disturbed by a right-wing current that threatens to undermine the remaining social rights in this province.

  • How Manitoba’s Indigenous community stopped Meech

    It must have been tempting, especially within the MLA’s NDP caucus, to grandstand for votes in the next provincial election with the province’s electorate so strongly behind the Cree MLA. On June 23, it was official. Harper, a politician with roots on the trapline and not in the boardrooms, had used legislative procedural tactics to defeat the accord.

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