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Africa

  • France and US killed Qaddafi for his gold and oil

    During the 2011 Libyan uprising, the United Nations Security Council passed Resolution 1973 which called for a ceasefire and authorized military action to protect civilian lives. A coalition formed, centered around NATO with the March 17, 2011 passing of the Resolution. Its purpose – a so-called “no-fly zone” over Libya.

  • Manitoba Hydro’s privatization of Nigeria’s power grid would be illegal in home province

    Largely unbeknownst to its owners, Manitoba Hydro International has stirred significant controversy in Africa’s most populous nation. Over the past four years the Nigerian press has published hundreds of articles about MHI’s diplomatic backing, conflicts with local officials and disputes over its four-year contract to manage the Transmission Company of Nigeria.

  • Canadian Mining Abuses in Africa

    Is Justin Trudeau prepared to defy Canada’s powerful mining industry and adopt legislation to constrain their abuses abroad or will he continue to place the full power of Canadian foreign-policy behind this controversial industry?

  • Shadows of Algeria: the Lost Context of the Paris Attacks

    It wasn’t just one of the attackers who vanished after the Paris massacre. Three nations whose history, action–and inaction–help to explain the slaughter by Isis have largely escaped attention in the near-hysterical response to the crimes against humanity in Paris: Algeria, Saudi Arabia and Syria.

  • My Day at the International Criminal Court

    I have written previously about the two Kenyan crimes against humanity cases being heard before the International Criminal Court in The Hague - in December 2010, when six suspects were first named in the case, and in January 2012, when the judges confirmed charges against four of the accused. By October 2014, there were only three suspects, charges being dropped again the other three.

  • Hotel Propaganda

    Rwanda circa 1994, is, in all likelihood, if not the, then certainly one of the greatest propaganda swindles of all time. This is the story of that swindle and of the scandalous truth that lies buried beneath it.

  • Hotel Propaganda

    On the evening of April 6th 1994 a plane carrying the Hutu leaders of both Rwanda and Burundi was shot down as it approached Kanombe airport.

  • Hidden histories and political legacies of the Canadian anti-apartheid movement

    The history of those ordinary Canadians who fought against apartheid has tragically been lost, and those who decried Mandela as a communist terrorist elevated as humanitarian heroes in his passing. Canadian Dimension collective member Chris Webb unpacks the hidden history of Canada’s anti-apartheid movement.

  • Our shame: Canada supported apartheid South Africa

    Ottawa;s policy towards apartheid South Africa was controversial among Canadians. There was an active solidarity movement that opposed Canadian support for the racist regime and to the extent that Canadian politicians played a role in challenging South African apartheid it was largely due to their efforts.

  • Not Out of the Woods

    On 21 December 2011, at the opening of the “Dutch Winters” art exhibit at the Rijksmuseum located in Amsterdam’s chic Schiphol Airport, a painting was put on display that, for those following closely the International Criminal Court’s cases against six Kenyans, offered a starling omen. The ICC’s Chief Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo, initiated investigations after Kenya’s disputed presidential election in December 2007 led to two months of violence that left some 1,300 dead and several hundred thousand evicted from their homes. Ocampo fingered six men as “most responsible.”

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