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BTL 4

Abdul Malik

  • Beyond the New Democratic Party

    In charting a course forward, amid the pandemic and beyond, socialists must use their energy strategically. Transforming the New Democratic Party, for many, might simply prove to be too costly or too pointless to manage in a time of great upheaval and even greater opportunity. With so many trains leaving the station, is the NDP’s the right one to jump on?

  • From Winnipeg to Tokyo: Sports capitalism and the surveillance state

    With the sports world’s recent focus on police violence and racial justice there must also be a focus on other issues that surround almost every major sporting event: policing and security. Sports enterprises that claim to support anti-racism must be pushed to take steps away from overpolicing and towards divestment from intelligence technology apparati that reflect the most draconian elements of capitalist security governance.

  • Watching football in Trumpland: Sports and the populist right

    Culture informs politics, and politics inform culture. The often confounding questions of why people vote against their own interests, get swept up in conspiracy theories, or rally behind politicians who only seek to further their own agenda has answers that can be difficult to articulate, given the complex intersections at play. But to understand it, we don’t need to look much further than the field.

  • Modern Monetary Theory could be the key to unlocking Canada’s economic future

    Canada is in a unique position to implement MMT, perhaps better than any country in the world. Elements of UBI have been tested before, but never all of them in concert. With increasing corporate capture of our everyday lives and the states that govern us, it may be time to try something new—even if it doesn’t take us all the way to a truly egalitarian and equitable society.

  • Jack Layton is the NDP’s third rail

    The NDP is in the midst of a quiet crisis. The party has not made significant headway since the 2015 federal election, when they won just under 20 percent of the vote, a number they repeated in 2019 with even worse results under Canada’s first-past-the-post electoral system. A big part of the problem may lie with an NDP legend who party faithful feel unable or unwilling to criticize: Jack Layton.

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