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NLR 2

Articles

  • ‘Consultocracy’ and the Not-So-New Public Management Paradigm

    With the widespread proliferation of New Public Management policies across Western nations during the 1980s came massive deregulation, privatization of public assets, smaller government, tax reductions for the rich, and increased influence of business on government policy—implemented through political donations, lobbyists and management consultants.

  • COVID-19 and Mass Unemployment—the NDP and Beyond

    Where is the independent voice for working people in this pandemic? Humanity is battered by both COVID-19 and a deep economic depression. We are not in this together. Canadian workers need a party that speaks for them. This is supposed to be the New Democratic Party. This article reviews the NDP’s actions in Canada and draws the conclusion that we need much better.

  • A Year for Fare-Free Transit

    Fare-free transit is an essential part of the solution to the combined crises of climate change and inequality. However, we can and should dream much bigger. A Green New Deal could provide the framework within which to demand the transit system we deserve: everything from nationalized electric-bus companies to the return of inter-city transit, to high-speed rail and, of course, free transit.

  • Jean Chrétien’s austerity made Canada less prepared for COVID-19

    Nearly three decades after Chrétien and Martin gutted federal support for the Canadian welfare state, the pandemic has made it clearer than ever that was a mistake. A federal role in health and social programs is necessary not only to make sure they are adequately funded, but also to be certain that the quality of programs and services is maintained across the country.

  • Jagmeet Singh’s treatment in parliament a telling reminder of Canada’s entrenched denial of racism

    Let us hope our white elected officials and citizens will take inspiration from Singh and also empathetically listen to the voices of anti-racist scholars and activists who have long documented the history of systemic racism in this country. This would be the first step in the struggle for an anti-racist future in Canada.

  • Canada’s membership in the Five Eyes alliance promoting conflict with China

    In recent weeks movements in different countries have toppled statues and put the police and other institutions upholding systemic racism on the defensive. Yet, amidst unprecedented protests against racism, there has been remarkably little interest in the white supremacist foreign policy alliance currently driving conflict with China.

  • The World Is Burning and Canada Will Not Extinguish It

    This week, Justin Trudeau and the Canadian establishment will try to interrupt the pandemic news cycle and spin it into a tale of how lucky we are to be in Canada, spared the ravages and conflicts of our southern neighbour, walking a more enlightened path for the last 153 years. Let’s not be fooled.

  • Forget Basic Income—In Canada, the New Normal Should Bring a Public Housing Revolution

    To better address inequality, we might first consider the comparatively unsexy, un-new idea of pursuing public housing and housing decommodification on a massive scale—call it a public housing revolution. Building tens of thousands of new social housing units every year, thus addressing backlogs and waitlists in the major megacities, is an obvious way forward.

  • Agribusiness drives severe decline of essential insects

    Insects keep the planet’s ecological system running, and ensure our food supply—75 percent of our most important crops depend on pollination by insects. Insects also improve soil quality and reduce plant pests by decomposing manure and dead plant matter. The Insect Atlas shows that insect species and pollinators are in severe decline because of pesticide-dependent industrial farming.

  • Should Canadian foreign policy be enmeshed with mining interests abroad?

    Should Canadian foreign policy continue to be enmeshed with mining interests abroad? That is one of ten questions put forward in an open letter calling for a “fundamental reassessment of Canadian foreign policy” following Canada’s second consecutive defeat for a seat on the United Nations Security Council.

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